your life is irrelevant

Discussion in 'The Alley' started by double ML, Apr 10, 2010.

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  1. DrugsBunny

    DrugsBunny Sage of Six Paths

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    Let me hear your theory on quantam physics then.

    Wait, that's right, you went into the military instead of college.
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  2. double ML

    double ML plekz = wannabe thought police

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    lmao@drugs bein' dumb enough to think that going to college means you're smart:funny:


    you act like nobody in the military has a college degree


    damn you dumb
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  3. DrugsBunny

    DrugsBunny Sage of Six Paths

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    In case your forgetting, my brother died in the army. I know it opens doors for people.

    But did you go to college? I never remember saying anything about it. Seemed like you wanted combat too much tbh.

    And since when did I say going to college made you smart? or is this one of those things where you think I said, so it's true?
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  4. double ML

    double ML plekz = wannabe thought police

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    i have 64 college credits, which i believe is equal to an AA.

    There are numerous mathematically equivalent formulations of quantum mechanics. One of the oldest and most commonly used formulations is the transformation theory proposed by Cambridge theoretical physicist Paul Dirac, which unifies and generalizes the two earliest formulations of quantum mechanics, matrix mechanics (invented by Werner Heisenberg) and wave mechanics (invented by Erwin Schrödinger).

    In this formulation, the instantaneous state of a quantum system encodes the probabilities of its measurable properties, or "observables". Examples of observables include energy, position, momentum, and angular momentum. Observables can be either continuous (e.g., the position of a particle) or discrete (e.g., the energy of an electron bound to a hydrogen atom). Generally, quantum mechanics does not assign definite values to observables. Instead, it makes predictions using probability distributions; that is, the probability of obtaining possible outcomes from measuring an observable. Oftentimes these results are skewed by many causes, such as dense probability clouds or quantum state nuclear attraction. Naturally, these probabilities will depend on the quantum state at the "instant" of the measurement. Hence, uncertainty is involved in the value. There are, however, certain states that are associated with a definite value of a particular observable. These are known as eigenstates of the observable ("eigen" can be translated from German as inherent or as a characteristic). In the everyday world, it is natural and intuitive to think of everything (every observable) as being in an eigenstate. Everything appears to have a definite position, a definite momentum, a definite energy, and a definite time of occurrence. However, quantum mechanics does not pinpoint the exact values of a particle for its position and momentum (since they are conjugate pairs) or its energy and time (since they too are conjugate pairs); rather, it only provides a range of probabilities of where that particle might be given its momentum and momentum probability. Therefore, it is helpful to use different words to describe states having uncertain values and states having definite values (eigenstate).


    3D confined electron wave functions for each eigenstate in a Quantum Dot. Here, rectangular and triangular-shaped quantum dots are shown. Energy states in rectangular dots are more ‘s-type’ and ‘p-type’. However, in a triangular dot the wave functions are mixed due to confinement symmetry.For example, consider a free particle. In quantum mechanics, there is wave-particle duality so the properties of the particle can be described as the properties of a wave. Therefore, its quantum state can be represented as a wave of arbitrary shape and extending over space as a wave function. The position and momentum of the particle are observables. The Uncertainty Principle states that both the position and the momentum cannot simultaneously be measured with full precision at the same time. However, one can measure the position alone of a moving free particle creating an eigenstate of position with a wavefunction that is very large (a Dirac delta) at a particular position x and zero everywhere else. If one performs a position measurement on such a wavefunction, the result x will be obtained with 100% probability (full certainty). This is called an eigenstate of position (mathematically more precise: a generalized position eigenstate (eigendistribution)). If the particle is in an eigenstate of position then its momentum is completely unknown. On the other hand, if the particle is in an eigenstate of momentum then its position is completely unknown.[22] In an eigenstate of momentum having a plane wave form, it can be shown that the wavelength is equal to h/p, where h is Planck's constant and p is the momentum of the eigenstate.

    Usually, a system will not be in an eigenstate of the observable we are interested in. However, if one measures the observable, the wavefunction will instantaneously be an eigenstate (or generalized eigenstate) of that observable. This process is known as wavefunction collapse, a debatable process. It involves expanding the system under study to include the measurement device. If one knows the corresponding wave function at the instant before the measurement, one will be able to compute the probability of collapsing into each of the possible eigenstates. For example, the free particle in the previous example will usually have a wavefunction that is a wave packet centered around some mean position x0, neither an eigenstate of position nor of momentum. When one measures the position of the particle, it is impossible to predict with certainty the result. It is probable, but not certain, that it will be near x0, where the amplitude of the wave function is large. After the measurement is performed, having obtained some result x, the wave function collapses into a position eigenstate centered at x.

    Wave functions can change as time progresses. An equation known as the Schrödinger equation describes how wave functions change in time, a role similar to Newton's second law in classical mechanics. The Schrödinger equation, applied to the aforementioned example of the free particle, predicts that the center of a wave packet will move through space at a constant velocity, like a classical particle with no forces acting on it. However, the wave packet will also spread out as time progresses, which means that the position becomes more uncertain. This also has the effect of turning position eigenstates (which can be thought of as infinitely sharp wave packets) into broadened wave packets that are no longer position eigenstates. Some wave functions produce probability distributions that are constant or independent of time, such as when in a stationary state of constant energy, time drops out of the absolute square of the wave function. Many systems that are treated dynamically in classical mechanics are described by such "static" wave functions. For example, a single electron in an unexcited atom is pictured classically as a particle moving in a circular trajectory around the atomic nucleus, whereas in quantum mechanics it is described by a static, spherically symmetric wavefunction surrounding the nucleus .

    The time evolution of wave functions is deterministic in the sense that, given a wavefunction at an initial time, it makes a definite prediction of what the wavefunction will be at any later time. During a measurement, the change of the wavefunction into another one is not deterministic, but rather unpredictable, i.e., random. A time-evolution simulation can be seen here.

    The probabilistic nature of quantum mechanics thus stems from the act of measurement. This is one of the most difficult aspects of quantum systems to understand. It was the central topic in the famous Bohr-Einstein debates, in which the two scientists attempted to clarify these fundamental principles by way of thought experiments. In the decades after the formulation of quantum mechanics, the question of what constitutes a "measurement" has been extensively studied. Interpretations of quantum mechanics have been formulated to do away with the concept of "wavefunction collapse"; see, for example, the relative state interpretation.
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  5. Gin Ichidrugu

    Gin Ichidrugu Kamishini no Yari

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    What were you majoring in?

    Just random classes?
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  6. double ML

    double ML plekz = wannabe thought police

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    military history
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  7. Gin Ichidrugu

    Gin Ichidrugu Kamishini no Yari

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    Why?

    And these questions are me just wondering.
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  8. double ML

    double ML plekz = wannabe thought police

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    might as well get a degree in something that interests me.
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  9. double ML

    double ML plekz = wannabe thought police

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    btw- whoever it is behind this gin alias, you can feel free to return to your usual retarded anti-double antics now
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  10. Gin Ichidrugu

    Gin Ichidrugu Kamishini no Yari

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    Very true, which is why I chose psychology.

    ....Gin Ichidrugu....

    I've tm'd the name drug/drugs on message boards.
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  11. double ML

    double ML plekz = wannabe thought police

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    indeed.


    you can return to your usual fail now.
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  12. Gin Ichidrugu

    Gin Ichidrugu Kamishini no Yari

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    and you can return to your usual robot antics.

    Match begin.

    lulz.
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  13. double ML

    double ML plekz = wannabe thought police

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    i do not possess these robot antics you so robotically speak of.
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  14. TWAMP$iN

    TWAMP$iN proper weaponry

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    you possess all those robotic antics we speak of.
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  15. Tha Cunnysmythe

    Tha Cunnysmythe Unsavoury Negroid

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    Possibly the most robotic sentence in the thread thus far.

    Imagine Ned from South Park saying that.
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  16. double ML

    double ML plekz = wannabe thought police

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    apparently y'all just sit around and think of what shit y'all can make up about me, and then y'all just jump on that sinking ship, no matter how absurd the concept


    really now? robot?

    morons.
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  17. TWAMP$iN

    TWAMP$iN proper weaponry

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    what a lying robot.
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  18. Link Gash

    Link Gash that ninja

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    what's with the copy and paste?
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  19. Whisky

    Whisky watch it

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    pure gay
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  20. double ML

    double ML plekz = wannabe thought police

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    lol@whisky callin' link gay:funny:
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