Women creating pay gap?

Discussion in 'Ladies Lounge' started by Konscious, Aug 16, 2006.

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  1. Konscious

    Konscious Resident Sage

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    In response to tight-eyes' thread about the notorious "equal work, equal pay" rhetoric... here are other factors that influence such a disparity that do not relate to SEXISM... sometimes, you have to examine with a critical eye instead of relying on a conditioned knee jerk reaction... the sex card can be unfairly played just as much as the race card.


    A new study finds female professionals lower their bills to maintain client relationships.

    By MSN Staff with wire services

    Are women helping create their own pay disparity? A new study suggests that may be the case.

    Female professionals often charge less than their male counterparts for the same work, preferring a strong client relationship to higher pay, according to a study to be released this week at the annual meeting of the Academy of Management.

    "Women view their pricing of a particular service as just one instance in a relationship where there will be many other services and many other pricing opportunities, as opposed to 'I need to make X profit on this transaction here,"' said Mary Gilly, a marketing professor at the University of California, Irvine, and a co-author of the study.

    Analyzing the pricing patterns of 536 veterinarians, the study found female vets charged needier clients less than more affluent clients, while male vets set their prices regardless of a client's situation.

    The widow discount?
    The female veterinarians -- about one-third of the total group -- adjusted their prices because they cared more about their relationships with their customers than did the men, the study said.

    The vets were asked to respond to a hypothetical scenario involving a 12-year-old dog with advanced kidney failure. The vets could offer treatment options to the hypothetical client, described either as a "young professional" or an "elderly widow." The female vets tended to charge the widow less.

    In larger veterinary practices, however, female veterinarians charged higher prices, as they took into consideration the needs of their co-workers as well, the study said.

    "Women ... take into consideration their customers, and they take into consideration their associates," Gilly said.

    "For women, their relationships with customers matter, their relationships with people they work with matter, and it doesn't seem to matter for men," she said. "Men just price the same, regardless."

    Nice matters
    Separate research in 2003 found female mortgage lenders made $575 less per loan than their male counterparts. That study suggested women brokers were more concerned about establishing good relationships and being nice than men.

    According to U.S. government statistics, overall, working women earn roughly 80 cents for every dollar a man makes.

    The Academy of Management, a research and teaching organization, has nearly 17,000 members worldwide. The study will be presented at the group's annual meeting on Wednesday.
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  2. Konscious

    Konscious Resident Sage

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    What is this? 9 looks and no replies? Ya punks!!
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  3. tight-eyes

    tight-eyes Such a F*cking Lady!

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    "There was a residual difference showing that women were being systematically paid 15% less. This is after taking account of other factors, such as working women being younger on average than men, because many leave the workforce to have children. They also tend to be less well-educated than men, with over half (51%) receiving only a basic secondary level education or less, compared to 43% of men.

    The Equal Opportunities Commission blames four factors for unequal pay:

    * Gender segregation in employment - because many women and men are concentrated in different areas of work. Those which are traditionally seen as women's work, such as nursing, teaching and clerical work tend to be lower paid. (60% of public sector workers are women.)

    * Different working patterns - where women are more likely to work part-time and take breaks to care for children

    * Direct discrimination in pay systems and

    * Undervaluation of women's jobs.
    These inequalities lead, according to the Commission, to "reduced economic independence; greater likelihood of low pay while working; and greater likelihood of poverty in old age."

    A Marxist analysis would add that unequal pay is another device used in the interests of the capitalist class to divide the workforce.
    "
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  4. tight-eyes

    tight-eyes Such a F*cking Lady!

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    "Equal Pay and Compensation Discrimination

    The right of employees to be free from discrimination in their compensation is protected under several federal laws, including the following enforced by the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC): the Equal Pay Act of 1963, Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the Age Discrimination in Employment Act of 1967, and Title I of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990.

    The Equal Pay Act requires that men and women be given equal pay for equal work in the same establishment. The jobs need not be identical, but they must be substantially equal. It is job content, not job titles, that determines whether jobs are substantially equal. Specifically, the EPA provides:

    Employers may not pay unequal wages to men and women who perform jobs that require substantially equal skill, effort and responsibility, and that are performed under similar working conditions within the same establishment. Each of these factors is summarized below:

    Skill - Measured by factors such as the experience, ability, education, and training required to perform the job. The key issue is what skills are required for the job, not what skills the individual employees may have. For example, two bookkeeping jobs could be considered equal under the EPA even if one of the job holders has a master's degree in physics, since that degree would not be required for the job.

    Effort - The amount of physical or mental exertion needed to perform the job. For example, suppose that men and women work side by side on a line assembling machine parts. The person at the end of the line must also lift the assembled product as he or she completes the work and place it on a board. That job requires more effort than the other assembly line jobs if the extra effort of lifting the assembled product off the line is substantial and is a regular part of the job. As a result, it would not be a violation to pay that person more, regardless of whether the job is held by a man or a woman.

    Responsibility - The degree of accountability required in performing the job. For example, a salesperson who is delegated the duty of determining whether to accept customers' personal checks has more responsibility than other salespeople. On the other hand, a minor difference in responsibility, such as turning out the lights at the end of the day, would not justify a pay differential.

    Working Conditions - This encompasses two factors: (1) physical surroundings like temperature, fumes, and ventilation; and (2) hazards.

    Establishment - The prohibition against compensation discrimination under the EPA applies only to jobs within an establishment. An establishment is a distinct physical place of business rather than an entire business or enterprise consisting of several places of business. However, in some circumstances, physically separate places of business should be treated as one establishment. For example, if a central administrative unit hires employees, sets their compensation, and assigns them to work locations, the separate work sites can be considered part of one establishment.

    Pay differentials are permitted when they are based on seniority, merit, quantity or quality of production, or a factor other than sex. These are known as "affirmative defenses" and it is the employer's burden to prove that they apply.

    In correcting a pay differential, no employee's pay may be reduced. Instead, the pay of the lower paid employee(s) must be increased."

    http://www.eeoc.gov/types/epa.html
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  5. tight-eyes

    tight-eyes Such a F*cking Lady!

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    Oh Yeah - "Girl Power"
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  6. UnbrokeN

    UnbrokeN Well-Known Member

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    i think ive broke this down in some other thread...women are definately Not unequally paid compared to men, never have been. its just that females on average dont work as many hours as their male counterparts, thats on average and doesnt count for all workers. and sure on average, males are able to work harder and more effective than their female counterpart..unless its some squeeky office job who seems to suit women perfectly.
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  7. .:AC:.

    .:AC:. Smokes or Bananas

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    women are better than men


    (i only said that to get laid)
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