What's actually makes you progress better?

Discussion in 'Health & Fitness' started by HOLLOW 55, Jan 28, 2006.

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  1. HOLLOW 55

    HOLLOW 55 You niggas cant trap here

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    Leg Press or squats?



    My high school football coach once told me that squats are the "epitome of exercise".


    They supposedly work out every muscle in your body. We HAD to do squats.


    But as I lift now, it seems that I see more defintion and progression when I leg press.

    Which is better?
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  2. p. haze

    p. haze slap boxed with jesus

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    Whats you goals? you want more definition or trying to get bigger?stronger?
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  3. Snikka

    Snikka Vision Action Execution

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    Squats are the greatest exercise in existance.


    Why you ask?


    One aspect of the squat is the difficulty involved in supporting large weights atop your body structure. Remember that in the leg press only your legs and hips actually support the weight. The squat on the other hand stresses, to varying degrees, all of the musculature of the back, delts, and traps as well. The stress on the body is just not the same with both exercises.

    Not to mention squats help to release the most GH, Testosterone, and when doing heavy squats your body responds by manipulating hormones responsible for causing increased protein synthesis in the involved muscles. The heavier the weight, the greater the muscle tension created and, hence, more muscle growth stimulated.

    This is why the squat helps OVERALL growth in almost all areas of your body, not just your legs.


    Leg Press is a good exercise tho, I don't prefer to do it.
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  4. Steve Schade

    Steve Schade Bears>you

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    All hail the mighty squat! Shit works 75% of the muscles in your body. Best compound exercise out.
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  5. HOLLOW 55

    HOLLOW 55 You niggas cant trap here

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    Good shit guys.


    I'm actually looking to get bigger. I'm big now, but bigger is always better.
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  6. p. haze

    p. haze slap boxed with jesus

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    Squats, plain and simple.

    Leg press isolates the legs and removes all extraneous factors such as balance and allows one to push the leg muscles much harder than you ever could in a squat, but that's not a true feat of strenght.

    Squats work out considerably more muscle groups (especially hip flexor something the leg press doesnt) and also helps develop coordination. It releases much more testosterone in your body promoting faster muscle growth.

    Alot people don't see results doing squats because they simply aren't doing it right. Make sure your legs go down enough so that your upper leg is parallel to the floor then EXPLODE up. Make sure you are working with a challenging weight.


    For more info read here:
    http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/shannon1.htm

    Squats > Leg press.

    *and I actually plan to write that before Snikka's bitch ass intervened, but you said something about definition so I was amking sure- hollla*
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  7. Snikka

    Snikka Vision Action Execution

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    ^^ I own you.


    Ass to the ground son... Ass to the ground.
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  8. p. haze

    p. haze slap boxed with jesus

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    That can really be bad for you, you know that.. right?
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  9. Snikka

    Snikka Vision Action Execution

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    dog... go watch a pro squat.


    "secret of the pros" number 1, squat below parallel to the ground and fully work the quad.


    I could link you to numerous videos.
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  10. Snikka

    Snikka Vision Action Execution

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    it should be well documented that squating half assed will primarily work the lower portion of the quad.


    you're in high school, go talk to your coach... he'll show you how to squat properly.
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  11. p. haze

    p. haze slap boxed with jesus

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    True.

    part 1: debunking the myths

    The squat is, perhaps, the single best exercise for leg strength and development. Squatting significantly strengthens the muscles responsible for knee and hip extension: quadriceps, hamstrings, and glutes, as well as the smaller stabilizing muscles such as the torso musculature. The squatting motion and position is also the foundation for many other exercises, such as deadlifts, Olympic lifts, and even every day lifting tasks. I think it is a very worthwhile task to learn how to squat, and anyone who can get out of a chair can do it. It has benefits not just for your strength, but for balance, confidence, daily-life strength, cardiovascular capacity, and active flexibility.

    Problem is, the squat is often taught incorrectly, and it's stigmatized as difficult and dangerous. People warn that it is bad for your knees and back, inappropriate for beginners (or anyone not a male collegiate athlete), too hard to learn, blah blah the sky is falling, etc. So, let's go through all the scary things we've heard about squatting, to debunk them one by one.

    myth #1: squatting must not be done with a full range of motion or you will hurt your knees.

    This is probably the worst myth of all. It's one of those "well known facts" which is mysteriously unsupported in the research (it's a well known fact that as soon as you say "it's a well known fact", you won't be able to back it up). According to this myth, full squats (a squat in which the knee joint is taken through a full range of motion, so that at the bottom the hamstrings make contact with the calves) are inherently dangerous, particularly to the knee joint.

    While biomechanical research does support the fact that forces on the connective tissues of the knee increase with the knee angle, particularly on the posterior cruciate ligament, there is no evidence that these increased forces actually lead to injury. There is no direct evidence that full squatting causes or even exacerbates knee pain nor damage. I do not know of a single documented case where full squatting led directly to knee injury. Not one! Which is pretty amazing, considering that the clinical literature is positively littered with injury narratives. You'd think we'd see some evidence, but there is nothing, nada, zero. Studies of Olympic weightlifters and powerlifters, both of whom squat with heavy loads, show no increased risk of knee damage in either population. Olympic lifters, in particular, regularly drop to full depth under hundreds of pounds, perhaps as often a hundred times a week or more, for years, and yet their knees are healthier than those of people such as skiiers, jumpers, or runners. No study, short or long term, has ever shown an increase in knee laxity from deep squatting.

    In fact, there is strong evidence that squatting actually improves knee stability! The increased strength, balance, and proprioception from regular squatting can make a substantial contribution to keeping knees healthy. Progressive overload (beginning with a light load, then increasing gradually as the trainee is able) assists in strengthening connective tissues and muscles surrounding the joint.

    Most interesting to me is the problem with what is usually recommended as "safe": squatting to parallel. At parallel (where the thigh is parallel to the floor, higher than the depth of a full squat by about 30 degrees), the compressive forces on the patella (kneecap) are actually at their highest (Huberti & Hayes, Journal of Bone Joint Surgery, 1984: 715-724). Decelerating, stopping, and reversing direction at this angle can inspire significant knee pain in even healthy people, whereas full squats present no problem. Another exercise which is supposedly "safer" is the leg extension, even though patellar tension and shear forces on the knee joint are demonstrably higher with such an exercise (see sidebar).

    It is worthwhile at this point to comment on the things that do cause knee injury. The primary causes of knee injury involve:

    a) twisting under a load

    b) too much load (for example, I heard of a guy who boasted that he could squat 800 lbs. He had never done it before, and couldn't even full squat half that much, but he decided that 800 was a good round number, and he was going to attempt to quarter squat it. Long story short, knee ligaments did not agree with his assessment)

    c) landing unevenly from a jump, especially with straightened rather than bent legs (this is a big problem for folks like basketball and volleyball players)

    d) being in a situation where one part of the leg is held stationary while the other is moving (for example, stepping in a gopher hole while running: shin stays in place while the thigh keeps moving)

    e) impact to the knee (such as a hit from the side or front in football)

    In other words, knee injury usually results from varus or valgus force (twisting of the joint in either direction), inappropriate loading, or forcible shear across the joint. It does not occur simply from taking the knee joint through a full range of motion, using correct technique, and using a weight which is appropriate to the abilities of the trainee.
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  12. Snikka

    Snikka Vision Action Execution

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    do it however you want.


    my knees are doing great.. I hear no cracking or have no aches.


    go watch a milos sarvec video or watch that dude from poland (the strongman competitor) or anyone who's actually professional level, do squats.


    I can feel the the difference and you don't necssarily have to do HEAVY ass weight.


    if I wanna squat 350-400, I'll do it your way to a parallel.

    if I put 225 on the bar and squat nice and deep, I feel it in the top portion of my quads.



    it's irrelevant to me if you type up a fucking essay about it and try to debate me.
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  13. Snikka

    Snikka Vision Action Execution

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    Why do you think I've made so much progress so quickly?


    I'm not an idiot.. I've been doing this shit for awhile man..


    everyone else can do shit however they want.. but I'll just be better.
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  14. Snow Turd

    Snow Turd New Member

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    Aye Purple Haze, post a picture of yo ass.
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  15. supacilious

    supacilious master of ceremonies

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    i agree that if you are trying to build a big useless muscle that has no strength behind it then yeah squatting deep with 225 would be helpful...but it wont make you stronger...the only way to get stronger is to lift heavy weights...

    if you want to learn how to squat properly i suggest you read up on the westside barbell club...

    http://www.t-nation.com/readTopic.do?id=459775

    read this article by dave tate
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  16. Snikka

    Snikka Vision Action Execution

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    ^^ I suggest you watch a pro.


    i already explained the mechanics of why.


    somthing tells me the westside barbell club isn't gonna help the matter.


    how should I put this? you're wrong.
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  17. Snikka

    Snikka Vision Action Execution

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    although I respect T-nation writers usually, I'm gonna have to say to get full quad development, you need to squat deep.


    good article tho, lots of useful information.
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  18. Steve Schade

    Steve Schade Bears>you

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    [funny] Nice.

    I usually try to go down as far as possible.
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  19. Snikka

    Snikka Vision Action Execution

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    it depends how you do your squats.

    if you squat with a barbell, squatting to parallel is gonna be your best bet if you wanna go for big weight and strength.

    but if you use a lighter weight and squat a bit below parallel, you work your upper quads more.


    it would seem to me that it would improve your out of the box bursting power/strength.


    i could be wrong. I do it both ways dependant on what I'm trying to do. same with my foot placement to hit outer vs. inner quads, etc.
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  20. supacilious

    supacilious master of ceremonies

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    i understand that squatting deep hits the upper quad harder...imma be honest and say i never squat as deep as a olympic lifter...the most ill do is 2 inches below parrallel

    because im mainly concerned on building my posterior chain and explosive power...but what you said about the bursting off the box strength was interesting...imma look into that more
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