Union with Christ is the purpose of Christian mysticism.

Discussion in 'The Sanctuary' started by lyricalpriest, Feb 5, 2013.

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  1. lyricalpriest

    lyricalpriest Rap Games Dawson Creek

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    Christ's disciples have been considered by some to be the first Christian mystics. They were called disciples because, as with mystics of other religions (such as the stoics and sramanic traditions), they followed a discipline prescribed by their teacher—in this case Jesus himself.

    Of special importance are the following concepts:[6]
    Da'at (knowledge) and Chokhmah (wisdom), which come from years of reading, praying and meditating the scriptures;
    Shekhinah, the presence of God in our daily lives, the superiority of that presence to earthly wealth, and the pain and longing that come when God is absent;
    the hiddenness of God, which comes from our inability to survive the full revelation of God's glory and which forces us to seek to know God through faith and obedience;
    "Torah-mysticism", a view of God's laws as the central expression of God's will and therefore as worthy object not only of obedience but also of loving meditation and Torah study; and
    poverty, an ascetic value, based on the apocalyptic expectation of God's impending arrival, that characterized the Jewish people's reaction to being oppressed by a series of foreign empires.
    In Christian mysticism, Shekhinah became mystery, Da'at became gnosis, and poverty became an important component of monasticism

    practices such as the Eucharist, baptism and the Lord's Prayer all become activities that take on importance for both their ritual and symbolic values. Other scriptural narratives present scenes that become the focus of meditation: the Crucifixion of Jesus and his appearances after his Resurrection are two of the most central to Christian theology; but Jesus' conception, in which the Holy Spirit overshadows Mary, and his Transfiguration, in which he is briefly revealed in his heavenly glory, also become important images for meditation. Moreover, many of the Christian texts build off of Jewish spiritual foundations, such as chokhmah, shekhinah

    Protestantism
    As part of the Protestant Reformation, theologians turned away from the traditions developed in the Middle Ages and returned to biblical and early church sources. Accordingly, they were often skeptical of Catholic mystical practices, which seemed to them to downplay the role of grace in redemption and to support the idea that human works can play a role in salvation, and which also seemed to come from post-biblical sources and practices. However, Quakers, Anglicans, Episcopalians, Lutherans, Pentecostals and Charismatics have in various ways remained open to the idea of mystical experiences.

    Historically, Christian mysticism has taught that for Christians the major emphasis of mysticism concerns a spiritual transformation of the egoic self, the following of a path designed to produce more fully realized human persons, "created in the Image and Likeness of God" and as such, living in harmonious communion with God, the Church, the rest of world, and all creation, including oneself. For Christians, this human potential is realized most perfectly in Jesus, precisely because he is both God and human, and is manifested in others through their association with him, whether conscious, as in the case of Christian mystics, or unconscious, with regard to spiritual persons who follow other traditions, such as Gandhi. The Eastern Christian tradition speaks of this transformation in terms of theosis or divinization, perhaps best summed up by an ancient aphorism usually attributed to Athanasius of Alexandria: "God became human so that man might become god.
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  2. lyricalpriest

    lyricalpriest Rap Games Dawson Creek

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    Christian mystics have been described as pursuing a threefold path corresponding to body, mind, and soul (or spirit). The three aspects later became purgative, illuminative, and unitive in the western churches and prayer of the lips, the mind, the heart in the eastern churches.

    Types of meditation
    Within theistic mysticism two broad tendencies can be identified. One is a tendency to understand God by asserting what He is not and the other by asserting what He is. The former leads to what is called apophatic theology and the latter to cataphatic theology.
    Apophatic (imageless, stillness, and wordlessness) -- e.g., The Cloud of the Unknowing, Meister Eckhart; and
    Cataphatic (imaging God, imagination or words) -- e.g.,The Spiritual Exercises of St. Ignatius of Loyola, Dame Julian, Francis of Assisi,[40] This second type is considered by Pseudo-Dionysius the Areopagite [41]
    Scholars such as Urban T. Holmes, III have also categorized mystical theology in terms of whether it focuses on illuminating the mind, which Holmes refers to as speculative practice, or the heart/emotions, which he calls affective practice. Combining the speculative/affective scale with the apophatic/cataphatic scale allows for a range of categories:[42]
    Rationalism = Cataphatic and speculative
    Pietism = Cataphatic and affective
    Encratism = Apophatic and speculative
    Quietism = Apophatic and affective

    Miracles
    Some mystics are said to have been able to perform miracles. But for many mystics, the miracles occurred to them. In the Middle Ages, one common form of mystical miracle, especially for women, was the Eucharistic miracle, such as being able to eat nothing other than the communion host. Catherine of Genoa was an example of someone who experienced this type of miracle.

    Genesis 15 begins, "After these things the word of the Lord came to Abram in a vision:" but even the reference to Adam and Eve walking with God in the Garden of Eden is subject to an interpretation which includes the mystical encounter between flesh and blood and God: between God and his spoken word, between God and His wisdom, teachings, Self-revelation, and of His relation to us as His creatures.
    Numbers 12:6 includes the Lord speaking from a pillar of fire which had come down, "And he said, 'Hear my words: If there is a prophet among you, I the LORD make myself known to him in a vision; I speak with him in a dream.'" The Lord then goes on to state that with Moses, He speaks mouth to mouth, not in figures as with others who are present. This with many other examples expresses the various means by which God may be encountered by His creatures—not as an overwhelming union of absorption, but in a relationship which preserves the identity of each, while focusing upon the intimacy possible.
    The Christian mystical practices are rooted in the experiences of the Jewish patriarchs, prophets and other encounters found in the Jewish Canon of Scripture: Visions, dreams, angelic messengers, divine inspiration, miraculous events, and wisdom all are of the more profound examples. Just as Old Testament prophets seem rooted in a direct consciousness of the Divine Presence (e.g. Ezekiel), the less profound such as are to be found in several psalms (e.g. Psalm 73:23-26), none-the-less, suggest a similar mystical awareness.
    New Testament
    2 Peter 1:4 says that God enables Christians to be "partakers of the divine nature."
    John 17:21 records Jesus' prayer for his followers during the last supper: "You, Father, are in Me, and I in You; [I pray] that they also may be one in Us."
    The mystical experience of the apostles, Peter, John, and James, at the Transfiguration of Jesus, is confirmed in each of the Synoptic Gospels. See, e.g., Mark 9:2-8. Jesus led the three to the top of Mount Tabor. Before the eye of the disciples, he was transformed. His face shone like the sun, and his clothes became brilliant white. Elijah and Moses appeared to them. Then “A cloud came, overshadowing them and a voice came out of the cloud, and said “This is my beloved Son. Listen to him.""[43]
    In II Corinthians 12:2-6, St. Paul refers to what tradition says was his own mystical experience, when he speaks of a man who was "caught up to the third heaven." [44]
    In Galatians 2:20, Paul says "It is no longer I who live, but Christ lives in me."
    In Ephesians 4:6, Paul writes "[There is] one God and Father of all who is above all and through all and in all.
    1 John 4:16: "He who abides in love abides in God, and God in him."
    1 Corinthians 6:19: "Do you not know that your bodies are temples of the Holy Spirit, who is in you, whom you have received from God?"
    2 Timothy 1:14: "Guard the good deposit that was entrusted to you—guard it with the help of the Holy Spirit who lives in us."
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  3. Nu'maaN

    Nu'maaN Anu'naki, Nuqqa.

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    are these hebrew words?

    or aramaic?

    :numaan:
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  4. lyricalpriest

    lyricalpriest Rap Games Dawson Creek

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  5. Nu'maaN

    Nu'maaN Anu'naki, Nuqqa.

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    cool.

    can you read hebrew?

    :numaan:
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  6. lyricalpriest

    lyricalpriest Rap Games Dawson Creek

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    Not at all.. but i most definitly would love to learn but i think i'd wanna know arabic first.



    did u see my latest battle? the Jihader line.. did u hear it?
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  7. Nu'maaN

    Nu'maaN Anu'naki, Nuqqa.

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    no.

    type it out.

    :numaan:
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  8. lyricalpriest

    lyricalpriest Rap Games Dawson Creek

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    fastin all month like it was rammadan
    so hungry now im ready to get my waxing on somebody pass the salt
    I don't JUST go hard, i go jiharder.
    this is just a starter, Bishimallah i'm spawning the intifadah
    I put that on alla Ima sonnin' jew u should call me abba
    for those that don't know Abba is hebrew for Fatha'
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  9. Nu'maaN

    Nu'maaN Anu'naki, Nuqqa.

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    hahahaha, that i don't go jihad, i go jiharder was me.

    rhyming it with intifadah was mine too lol, i fucking love it.

    :numaan:
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  10. lyricalpriest

    lyricalpriest Rap Games Dawson Creek

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    Thanx! I appreciate your creative input. I hope it made u proud!
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