The entire teachings of Jesus had more in common with Buddhism than it does with...

Discussion in 'The Sanctuary' started by lyricalpriest, Apr 2, 2012.

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  1. lyricalpriest

    lyricalpriest Rap Games Dawson Creek

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    If you carefully comb thru what i've written I'm sure I even comment on your question.
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  2. lyricalpriest

    lyricalpriest Rap Games Dawson Creek

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    The idea of a literal 24 hour time period when Jesus will judge the dead can be refuted with the following Bible verses:

    "With the Lord a day is like a thousand years, and a thousand years are like a day." (2 Peter 3:8-9)

    Using the above definition, it is possible that we may already be living in the "day of Judgment." Perhaps this is the correct interpretation of the following passage:

    "In the time of my favor I heard you, and in the day of salvation I helped you." I tell you, now is the time of God's favor, now is the day of salvation." (2 Cor. 6:2)

    Whether the "day of salvation" and the "day of judgment" and the "day of the Lord" and the "end of days" and the "day of death" are all references to the same day is anyone's guess. Nevertheless, near-death experiences and early Christian and Buddhist writings suggests that "Judgment Day" is the day of death. The following passage refers to this time of judgment:

    "For it is not those who hear the law who are righteous in God's sight, but it is those who obey the law who will be declared righteous ... This will take place on the day when God will judge men's secrets through Jesus Christ." (Rom. 2:12-16)

    Because many people in the Bible were declared righteous during their life and did not have to wait until the end of days, the conclusion is that people don't have to wait until the end of days for judgment.
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  3. lyricalpriest

    lyricalpriest Rap Games Dawson Creek

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    One of the most controversial passages of scripture dealing with the doctrine of reincarnation is the conversation that Jesus had with Nicodemus, a Pharisee who believed in reincarnation (as all Pharisees did in those days). The controversy, as it was with Nicodemus, has to do with the metaphor "born again" and what it means. Jesus uses the concept of rebirth to explain both physical rebirth (reincarnation) and spiritual rebirth (regeneration by the Holy Spirit). Jesus explains to Nicodemus:

    "I tell you a truth, no one can see the kingdom of God unless he is born again." (John 3:3)

    Jesus affirms that the way to heaven is through spiritual regeneration by the Holy Spirit. Although Nicodemus knew how people are reborn into the world through reincarnation, he couldn't understand how people are reborn into the kingdom of God through reincarnation. This confusion becomes apparent with Nicodemus' next statement:

    "How can a person be born when he is old? Surely he cannot enter a second time into his mother's womb to be born!" (John 3:4)

    Nicodemus was confused about Jesus' use of the phrase "born again" when not used to describe physical rebirth (i.e., reincarnation). As an intelligent Pharisee, he was well aware that souls come from a past life to be born as babies. But he couldn't understand how a soul can get to heaven through physical rebirth. Because of this, Jesus explained to him the difference between physical rebirth and spiritual rebirth:

    "I tell you the truth, no one can enter the kingdom of God unless he is born of water and the Spirit. Flesh gives birth to flesh, but the Spirit gives birth to spirit." (John 3:5-6)
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  4. lyricalpriest

    lyricalpriest Rap Games Dawson Creek

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    we are entering the age of Aquarius the mysteries are revealing them self to those wit the eyes and ears to hear and see..
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  5. RandomPoster

    RandomPoster New Member

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    Ya'll are gonna have me sounding all wishy washy around here! LOL! But I see what you're saying here. You're not talking the reincarnation in the sense of coming back as a caterpillar or something but a person's spirit resting on another person. I kind of agree with this but I'd probably say that it's more the same Spirit from God that was on Elijah was also on John the Baptist. Elijah in and of himself had no power outside of the Spirit of God. I'll need to study this out. Interesting. Thanks for sharing.
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  6. lyricalpriest

    lyricalpriest Rap Games Dawson Creek

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    oncerning other Bible verses that refer to reincarnation, the following passage is a clear statement:

    "All these people were still living by faith when they died. They did not receive the things promised; they only saw them and welcomed them from a distance. And they admitted that they were aliens and strangers on Earth. People who say such things show that they are looking for a country of their own. If they had been thinking of the country they had left, they would have had opportunity to return. Instead, they were longing for a better country - a heavenly one. Therefore God is not ashamed to be called their God, for he has prepared a city for them." (Heb. 11:13-16)

    The above passage describes people who had an opportunity to return to Earth after death. This could only come about through reincarnation.
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  7. lyricalpriest

    lyricalpriest Rap Games Dawson Creek

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    The verse below from the Book of James is one of the clearest references to reincarnation in the Bible:

    "And the tongue is a fire: the world of iniquity among our members is the tongue, which defileth the whole body, and setteth on fire the wheel of nature, and is set on fire by hell." (James 3:6, ASV)

    The phrase "wheel of nature" is mistranslated in other versions of the Bible as "the whole course of life." But James actually uses the phrase "trochos tes geneseos" which had a special meaning in those days. It literally means the "wheel of nature." By using this phrase, James gave this statement a specific technical reference to reincarnation (full references in the commentaries of Mayor and W. Bauer). The revolution of the wheel symbolizes the cycle of successive lives. The comparison of life to a wheel and the symbol of the wheel itself was and is a common symbol in many religions and civilizations referring to reincarnation. According to Flavius Josephus, the Jewish temple at Jerusalem had the wheel of the zodiac inlaid in its floor. The wheel of the zodiac is mentioned in the Talmud and even in the Bible (Job 38:32) (See Hebrew translation of "constellation"). The wheel is also related to the mystical wheel of fortune which is another reference to reincarnation. For thousands of years, orthodox Jews have been believers in reincarnation and their scriptures, the Zohar, is a book of great authority among orthodox Jews. It states the following:

    "All souls come in reincarnation (literally "wheeling") and humans don't know the ways of the Lord and how the Scales stand and how people are judged every day and time. How the souls are judged before entering this world and how they are judged after leaving it" (Zohar, Mishpatim 32)
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  8. lyricalpriest

    lyricalpriest Rap Games Dawson Creek

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    "For Christ died for sins once for all, the righteous for the unrighteous, to bring you to God. He was put to death in the body but made alive by the Spirit, through whom also he went and preached to the spirits in prison who disobeyed long ago..." (1 Peter 3:18-20)

    The reference to imprisoned spirits whom Jesus freed from the "prison" of Sheol is incompatible with a resurrection at the end of time but is a good reference to reincarnation. This liberation of spirits from Sheol is mentioned several times in the Bible:
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  9. lyricalpriest

    lyricalpriest Rap Games Dawson Creek

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    Due to the condemnation of pre-existence (and reincarnation) by church authorities in 553 A.D., reincarnation became an enemy concept to the Judeo-Christian West. The reason reincarnation was declared heresy was given by Gregory, the Bishop of Nyssa. The five reasons he gave were:


    (1) It seems to minimize Christian salvation.

    (2) It is in conflict with the resurrection of the body.

    (3) It creates an unnatural separation between body and soul.

    (4) It is built on a much too speculative use of Christian scriptures.

    (5) There is no recollection of previous lives.

    In conclusion, this Biblical defense of reincarnation leads to the following conclusions:

    (1)

    The religious concept of a massive worldwide reanimation of corpses at the end of time is a foreign concept originating from ancient Persia.

    (2) A massive worldwide reanimation of corpses seems bizarre, unnatural, and repulsive.

    (3)

    The few instances recorded in the Bible where corpses were reanimated were miracles. Doctors today bring people back from the dead with modern technology.

    (4) Reincarnation was widely believed by the people of Israel in the days of Jesus and by people all around the world.

    (5)

    All Hebrew and Christian scriptures support reincarnation: the Bible, the Dead Sea Scrolls, the Christian Gnostic gospels, the Torah, the Hebrew Bible, the Apocrypha, the Kabbalah and Zohar.

    (6)

    Many of the Biblical references to "resurrection" refer to spiritual regeneration while already physically alive instead of the reanimation of corpses on the so-called "Last Day."

    (7)

    Reincarnation is the rebirth of a person's spirit into a new body to be born again as an infant. Resurrection is the "spiritual awakening" of a living person's spirit by the power of the Holy Spirit.

    (8) The Bible records Jesus himself teaching reincarnation to his followers.

    (9)

    Early Christians in Jerusalem believed in reincarnation and taught it until it was declared a heresy by the Church of Rome.

    (10) Reincarnation has been a tenet in Orthodox Judaism for thousands of years and continues to this day.

    (11)

    The concept of reincarnation is supported by many near-death experiences including those where Jesus appears.

    (12)

    Reincarnation is a doctrine which can be accepted by every follower of Christ and should be a part of orthodox Christian doctrine.
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