Spirulina: A green, lean, health-machine

Discussion in 'Health & Fitness' started by zyclon B gas, Oct 25, 2010.

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  1. zyclon B gas

    zyclon B gas sososerious

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    Yes, that’s right, spirulina is a plant. More technically, it’s a form of micro-algae that is blue-green in color and rich in vitamins and minerals. This microalgae is the same type of algae that you’d find on freshwater ponds and streams, thermal springs and saltwater lakes. It’s a hearty organism that can adapt to many different environments and thrive where many other organisms cannot, requiring only a drop of water and a beam of sunshine to survive. This heartiness makes it even more nutritious for you.

    Spirulina’s popularity comes from it being a rich source of vegetarian protein and natural vitamins and minerals. It’s one of the highest protein-containing plants, being 60-70% protein by weight, and also contains substantial amounts of vitamin B12 and iron (usually only found in meats), vitamin K and beta-carotene.

    For people looking to either reduce the animal protein load of their diet, or for vegetarians, spirulina is a great substitute and source of quality protein and amino acids. It does tend to be lower in certain amino acids than animal proteins, but when eaten in a mixed diet, it compliments other vegetarian proteins, like beans and nuts.

    Therapeutically, spirulina has several health benefits. In a variety of different human and animal studies, spirulina has been shown to improve blood cholesterol profiles, boost immunity, enhance the population of healthy gut bacteria, control blood sugars and help people lose body fat safely.


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    For your heart health, a study of 30 men with mild hyperlipidemia (high blood cholesterol), took 4.2 g of spirulina each day for 8 weeks, or spirulina only for 4 weeks with 4 weeks off. Those who took it for 8 weeks had a significant reduction of LDL-cholesterol (bad cholesterol) and a significant reduction in their atherogenic index (a measure of fat deposition in arteries). The men who only took Spirulina for 4 weeks and nothing for another 4 weeks also had the same results at the midpoint mark, but then a return to baseline values after they stopped taking this green goodness.

    So, if you’re struggling with high LDL cholesterol, spirulina may be one way to lower it and decrease your risk for heart disease.

    With its high protein content and rich source of vitamins and minerals, spirulina is a great addition to any person’s diet.
    test
  2. Ralph Pootawn

    Ralph Pootawn New Member

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    I really would like to take something like that and brewers yeast too.
    test
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