Psychedelic Mushrooms May Help Treat Drug Addiction?

Discussion in '420Lounge' started by GaLaTeA, Jun 22, 2010.

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  1. GaLaTeA

    GaLaTeA GymArt

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    Psychedelic Mushrooms May Help Treat Drug Addiction; Somebody Call the Irony Police - Phoenix News - Valley Fever

    ...medical shrooms coming soon?:huh:
    test
  2. devastator

    devastator Whut?¿!

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    yes mushrooms(other psychadelics to) is a great way to review what kind of position/situation you are in your life. You take a step back and look at your selves. To me this is logical it is very helpful for people who has gotten sidetracked into addiction that ruined their life. it might open their eyes to whatever harm they are doing to themselves/family/friends. I also read that they tested on alcoholics and results were positive.

    Remember the people of the amazon has done this for a long time already. The shaman with their brew(ayahuasca), some even use mushrooms to, use this to sort out all kinds of problems!
    test
  3. WorldHipHop

    WorldHipHop Carpe Diem

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    Ever hear of the Stoned Ape Theory? Says that we evolved fromapes that migrated from trees down to the ground and began to eat psychedelic shrooms as part of their regular diet. Shrooms have also been theorized to be the father of human language.
    test
  4. snowy

    snowy 39k Rap Song Music Folder

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    From Kirkus Reviews

    "The ethnobotanist co-author of Psilocybin: The Magic Mushroom Grower's Guide (not reviewed) puts forth the theory that magic mushrooms are the original "tree of knowledge'' and that the general lack of psychedelic exploration is leading Western society toward eventual collapse or destruction--controversial statements, to say the least, though the argument's details often prove fascinating. In the beginning, McKenna tells us, there were protohumans with small brains and plenty of genetic competition, and what eventually separated the men from the apes was an enthusiasm for the hallucinogenic mushrooms that grew on the feces of local cattle. Claiming that psilocybin in the hominid diet would have enhanced eyesight, sexual enjoyment, and language ability and would have thereby placed the mushroom-eaters in the front lines of genetic evolution--eventually leading to hallucinogen-ingesting shamanistic societies, the ancient Minoan culture, and some Amazonian tribes today--McKenna also asserts that the same drugs are now outlawed in the US because of their corrosive effect on our male-dominated, antispiritual society. Unconsciously craving the vehicles by which our ancestors expanded their imaginations and found meaning in their lives, he says, we feast on feeble substitutes: coffee, sugar, and chocolate, which reinforce competition and aggressiveness; tobacco, which destroys our bodies; alcohol, whose abuse leads to male violence and female degradation; TV, which deadens our senses; and the synthetics--heroin, cocaine and their variations--which leave us victimized by our own addiction. On the other hand, argues McKenna, magic mushrooms, used in a spiritually enlightened, ritual manner, can open the door to greater consciousness and further the course of human evolution- -legalization of all drugs therefore is, he says, an urgent necessity. Provocative words--often captivating, but not often convincing."
    test
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