"Nowadays you got more rappers than you got f*ckin fans"

Discussion in 'Hip-Hop Central' started by BLOODraven, Feb 22, 2012.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. reggie_jax

    reggie_jax rapper noyd

    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2007
    Messages:
    2,437
    i'm not saying you can't make a solid argument, i'm just asking someone to articulate it for me. listing an example of someone you don't like blowing up off net hype and declaring that the internet is therefore ruining hip hop is not what i'd consider a solid argument.

    it seems what's being ignored is that for soulja boy to blow up in the first place, people have to like his music.
    test
  2. PrecinctPhantom

    PrecinctPhantom UK Bawse

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2009
    Messages:
    25
    Soulja Boy had a catchy hook that a certain age range will enjoy; that age range will also buy into the whole dance crazes (look at New Boyz, that VIC guy who had 1 song, Hurricane Chris and whoever else). That's why they got popular. It's the same reason Justin Bieber is huge - kids and teens enjoy a brand of music that, to a more mature taste (or better taste; although i hate saying that since taste is clearly subjective) is downright shit. That's the reason this ease of distrubution leads to worse mainstream music - it's easier for trends suited to and geared towards a certain age range, with a limited view of how good music can be.

    This is why the GOOD underground shit that we hear because of the ease of distribution the internet provides never reaches this huge success and exposure - because the mainstream record labels aren't interested in THAT type of net-buzz; They want the acts who are fitting into whatever trend is fashionable in the mainstream market.

    Or at least that's my view haha
    test
  3. reggie jax

    reggie jax Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 17, 2006
    Messages:
    1,351
    sure, in the case of soulja boy you can blame the kids. and in the case of some of the club shit and rnb crossover shit you can take ignorant's approach and blame women/men trying to get pussy.

    but didn't all of these people exist in the 90's too? yea the net took a chunk of the sales through piracy. i guess adult males are the only ones downloading shit while females and kids actually buy albums?

    i dunno. i feel like there's got to be more to it than that. maybe hip hop maxed out its potential for innovation + mass appeal, so we've reached a point where in order to do anything really new or creative you sacrifice being accessible to the average consumer in the process?
    test
  4. Ignorant

    Ignorant Village Idiot

    Joined:
    May 31, 2004
    Messages:
    17,755
    Most A&R execs, program directors, label owners, etc. who control the ouput of hip hop in the mainstream do not love it... but they respect the money-making potential... there were A&Rs who didn't like it in the '90s and '80s, too... but a lot of them still signed mostly dope artists, even if they didn't sell well... because they listened to the streets and what they deemed "dope"... a lot of indie labels like Loud and Capitol had access to the mainstream media outlets... nowadays, they don't... because the media has conglomerated and decided to block access... because they only respond to what's "hot" and what's selling currently... I was only talking about what was driving the sales... so really, women and children are indirectly the blame, but they've always driven pop music sales... the direct blame belongs with the A&Rs and program directors... there is no diversity and variety of hip hop in the mainstream for a reason... and it's not always because the dope artists don't hustle hard enough.
    test
  5. reggie jax

    reggie jax Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 17, 2006
    Messages:
    1,351
    lemme make sure i understand you.. cause like i said i don't really research shit like this

    by the media conglomerating and blocking access you mean companies absorbing other companies, and buying up radio slots and shit like that?

    also, what do you think the turning point was that caused companies to stop listening to the streets to determine what's 'hot'? are they now able to dictate trends more directly, or are they using some other source than the streets to spot emerging trends?

    i feel like whenever i am exposed to the music on the radio, it sounds like the variety isn't just disappearing in hip hop but in every form of popular music. it almost sounds like all the various genres with pop sensibility are merging into one mega-genre that sounds like some sort of robotic dance clusterfuck.
    test
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page

Users Viewing Thread (Users: 0, Guests: 0)