man get the F-CK out of here - BOLT is the greatest OLYMPIAN EVER

Discussion in 'Audio Emcee Hook Ups' started by Nimrod, Aug 5, 2012.

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  1. Battyboi

    Battyboi New Member

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    ya it was stupid avgin out 400m to back the point up.

    i'm sure bolt would excel at the 400m, but u seen the dude, he so relaxed (recently he been sayin he wants to play soccer lmao). if hes happy with his life he shouldnt do somethin he dont want to do, i doubt he cares so much bout bein the greatest olympian ever. hes the greatest sprinter ever, thats for sure.

    at the same time theres prob brand n legacy protection, bolt losing a race is a really bad look. hed have to be 100% committed to 400m. phelps losing one of his 8 or w/e, not so much. thats not a slight on phelps tho.
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  2. Namor

    Namor Prodigal Sun-god

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    who said anything about "twice a day"? I specifically stated that they don't do the same exercises every day; they don't work the same muscle groups for consecutive days.

    Ex-you're not going to be bench pressing 3 days in a row.
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  3. D0minic0

    D0minic0 Og 666

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    Bolt Dat Nikka
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  4. exodus 31315

    exodus 31315 Kanaan

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    Please, read my post again.

    In case it was ambiguous, they perform the same lifts twice a day, and the same lifts 6 days a week.

    Yes, that means the same lifts for two successive days, which is what you said athletes cannot do in weight training. I apologize for paraphrasing, but I'm sure your post indicated something to that effect.

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  5. Z. Spitwell

    Z. Spitwell Well-Known Member

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    sotechnical
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  6. Z. Spitwell

    Z. Spitwell Well-Known Member

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    manik1
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  7. Namor

    Namor Prodigal Sun-god

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    dbl post
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  8. Namor

    Namor Prodigal Sun-god

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    I didn't say it was physically impossible. Just b/c certain athletes are doing so, does not make it right. In fact-Id love for you to name some of these athletes or training groups you have worked with, b/c this pretty much flies in the face of what various sources and my own experience on weight lifting would prescribe.

    When you lift weights and train in athletics such as sprinting-you are essentially tearing your muscles down. If you perform the same lift twice a day for consecutive days-then all one would be doing is breaking down muscles w/o giving them ample rest.

    Sorry bro-but you sound extremely uninformed as if you are making things up.
    Which track & field athletes were you working with EXACTLY. I've trained with & competed against actual D1 & WORLD CLASS SPRINTERS and various professional track & field coaches in my day-and they all would agree with me...

    What you have stated goes against basic fundamental weight lifting-which I why I need you to back up your claims...I simply don't believe you:

    and-if what you say is true-then these guys are simply training inefficiently.


    1. Overtraining

    A common mistake is that having sessions lasting hours long or performing tons of the same exercises several days a week will get you better gains. "Less is more" when it comes to weight training. Remember that your central nervous system and joints come into the picture, and suffer a lot more from the abuse of weight training then your muscles.


    Your muscles grow when you are resting, not when you are at the gym. This is because when you lift weights, you create tears in the muscle tissue. When you rest, the muscle repairs itself and becomes larger than before. How long it takes to repair will depend largely on your diet and how much sleep you get per night.

    To help avoid overtraining, use some of the routines already on this site, and remember not to take an intermediate or advanced workout routine until you have more experience. About 3 months before an intermediate routine and several years before an advanced routine. Remember that it is also recommended that about every 12 weeks, you take a week off of weight training to heal any of those little nagging injuries and to give your central nervous system a break.

    Realted overtraining article: Overtraining, Why Less Is More - By Shaun McEwan
    Common Weight Lifting Mistakes Made By Beginners | Muscle & Strength

    Photo Credit IT Stock/Polka Dot/Getty Images

    When on any type of weight training regimen, your body must recover from the demands put on it while lifting weights. While you could lift weights on consecutive days, it would be much more beneficial to work certain parts of your body harder and then allow the muscles to recover instead of working the same muscles groups on consecutive days.
    How Muscle is Built

    According to John M. Berardi, Ph.D., lifting weights creates microscopic tears in the muscles and surrounding tissues. As a result of the tearing and damage done during exercise, fluid builds up in the damaged areas, which causes some of the muscle soreness experienced after exercise. Proteins and other enzymes then enter the damaged area to help the muscle recover, which is what helps build the muscle that was damaged during lifting.

    #1 Way to Build Muscle Men of All Ages are Seeing Results With This One Trick. Try It Today! Force Factor ® Official Site | Home
    Sponsored Links
    The Importance of Recovery

    Because it takes time for the proteins and enzymes to heal the muscle, allow time for the muscle to fully recover and build additional tissue to replace what has been damaged. According to Berardi, muscle strength is depleted for 1 to 3 days and the complete recovery process could take up to 14 days. If you continue to lift on consecutive days without giving your muscles time to recover, the tissue will continue to break down without having the chance to grow.
    Speeding Up Recovery Time

    If you would like to lift on consecutive days, you can speed up the recovery process. Taking protein supplements allows the body to begin building the tissues that were damaged quicker than normal. In addition, Berardi suggests that you can continue to do light exercise during the recovery process to decrease the soreness from lifting. He also suggests that both regular massages and underwater jet massages can speed up the recovery process and get you lifting again.
    Reaching a Plateau Level

    An additional problem with lifting on consecutive days is that your body could get used to the exercise and create a plateau level in which it becomes difficult to see additional results. According to Bari Lieberman of "Men's Fitness," to continue seeing gains, you must switch up your exercise routine by modifying the set and repetition structure. If you're going to lift every day, continue to vary your workouts in the weight room so that your muscles don't get used to your routine.

    Read more: Is Weight Lifting On Consecutive Days Bad? | LIVESTRONG.COM
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  9. exodus 31315

    exodus 31315 Kanaan

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    If you have worked with Olympians, you would surely know that the stress (intensity, load and volume) required to disrupt homeostasis - the mechanism which effects adaptation through the process of neurological, musculoskeletal and physiological stimuli - cannot productively be achieved in one training session, without other variables being considered. This is an absolute fact of elite level athletes.

    Where you now say it is not physically impossible, and that just because some athletes are doing it does not make it right; you're wrong. At the elite level, ALL weightlifters are affected by this increase in magnitude and duration required to disrupt homeostasis, and ALL incorporate periodized training to deal with it. Periodization is a necessity in advanced programming.

    What you copy and pasted from livestrong regarding over training is accurate for beginners to intermediates even, where their work capacity to disrupt homeostasis is not so large, and their recuperative abilities reflect this. Conversely, advanced athletes might require up to three months to adapt to stressors large and cumulative enough to overload their work tolerance. Hence, progressive disruption of homeostasis - varied intensity, load and volume over successive days - is necessary to effect adaptation. Of course, you would already know this having worked with Olympians.

    If you haven't trained with any Olympic lifters and really believe the facts I described are ineffective, while you're over at livestrong, search for a Bulgarian weightlifting program, one of Sheiko's programs, one of the Greek weightlifting programs, the Chinese, US, Australian, in fact ANY advanced weightlifting program and then tell them that they're uninformed and ineffective.

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  10. exodus 31315

    exodus 31315 Kanaan

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    I've worked with professional boxers, first grade rugby league players and Olympic weightlifting head coaches such as Paul Gallen, Daniel Geale, Nedal Hussein, Anthony Mundine, Kostya Tszyu, Paul Briggs, Anthony Martin, Sergo Chakhoyan, Damon Kelly, and Luke Borreggine, to name a few. I've a bachelor's degree in exercise and sports science majoring in physiology and kinesiology. I've also competed professionally myself and had training "sessions lasting hours long or performed tons of the same exercises several days a week." That must be why my career failed.

    But please, research some advanced weightlifting programs, and let the respective coaches know that livestrong indicates that they're uninformed and ineffective in training the athletes who represent their nations.

    That last part you have bold made me smile. Get used to the exercise? Plateau? Men's Fitness?

    Please, I wasn't talking about your average gym goer, my friend. I explicitly stated advanced elite level athletes, I thought you had trained with them?

    I'm on the phone right now. If you like, when I'm home I can send you a program designed for an advanced weightlifter? I normally charge an initial $150 consultation, but I'll send you this so you can forward it to livestrong for them to correct for me.

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  11. Namor

    Namor Prodigal Sun-god

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    yet-I see no sprinters on your resume....track and field and sprinting in particular takes a lot more preparation than boxing-and the weight lifting regiment is a highly sensitive and crucial factor not seen in other sports. Athletes generally have to prepare 6-9 months in advance to peak for events that come months later.

    Do you have any experience in sprint training? That would be more useful to the topic @ hand...since a major conjecture point of this topic was stress and recovery.

    A boxer can train for a couple weeks and less than 3 months and be considered in top shape-Sprint training is entirely different and unless you have experience in that particular field you can't really draw comparisons to others disciplines.
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  12. exodus 31315

    exodus 31315 Kanaan

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    Yes, I've been involved in the development of sprinters' training programs. Granted, primarily pre season and early in a periodized schedule - namely the strength and mobility phase - where not a lot of time is devoted by the athlete to technical skills and competition experience. However, we would still perform exercises on successive days targeting the same muscle groups. Example: Morning Day 1, power cleans and Romanian deadlifts. Morning Day 2, snatch and Bulgarian split squats.

    I don't necessarily agree with you about less preparation for boxers than track athletes, but we've derailed the thread enough as it is. Yes a periodized program for athletes such as sprinters and weightlifters is certainly protracted compared to a boxers, but to attain the levels of elite fighters, the development is years in the making. Skill set, work capacity and conditioning don't need to be grouped in to the one category.

    And yes, I think I already mentioned that I incorporated sprints in to my own training programs over the years, but I specifically commented on your initial assertion relating to weight training, CNS effects and lifting everyday, which I quoted in my first post. And that remains the case.

    A boxer cannot train for a couple weeks and be considered in top shape, my goodness this is absurd. Really? Surely you've seen fights where a fighter is given late notice due to a cancellation because of injury and noticed the poor conditioning some exhibit as a result of this. Only fighters that stay in shape year round due to constant training usually show up in shape with late notice. Not to mention the years of development a boxer goes through from amateur competition to professional, short bouts to 12 rounds. That process is extremely lengthy.

    And don't mistake a 3 month training camp as the only training a fighter does.

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  13. J o o k

    J o o k Win your battles before they’ve even been fought.

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    Who read these nigguhs post :funny:

    Long ass essays holmes
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  14. exothermic

    exothermic Well-Known Member

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    yea stop writing those long epistles nobody tryna read that
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  15. That Nigga

    That Nigga aka Hot Shyt

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    lmao.. I was gonna mention that pages back but I let him cook
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  16. exothermic

    exothermic Well-Known Member

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    if yalll missed this documentary

    [youtube]UB_ZQfxXbTc[/youtube]
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  17. A.V.I.

    A.V.I. Well-Known Member

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    Phelps>Bolt

    [​IMG]
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  18. Battyboi

    Battyboi New Member

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  19. A.V.I.

    A.V.I. Well-Known Member

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    LMAO@bolts medal count compared to phelps

    shit is pathetic

    hahahahahahaha
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  20. A.V.I.

    A.V.I. Well-Known Member

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    Phelps working on a remix...

    Mo medals...Mo problems

    kapohh
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