Lehman College Hip-Hop Conference

Discussion in 'The Alley' started by identity-X, Jun 22, 2005.

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  1. identity-X

    identity-X No Talent Assclown

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    This doesn't really belong in HHC because it's about me and not hip-hop, so...

    Anyway...

    I just got an e-mail saying that an abstract I submitted to the organizers of this conference has been accepted and I will (funds permitting) be traveling to the Bronx in October to be a panelist in one of the sessions. I'll be presenting the research that I'm doing my thesis on, or at least some preliminary findings.



    I'm gangsta....
    test
  2. Sir Bustalot

    Sir Bustalot I am Jesus

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    nice.....

    whatchu gonna write a thesis on?
    test
  3. identity-X

    identity-X No Talent Assclown

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    I'm analyzing the extent to which political rap has/hasn't been successful in the mainstream over the last 20 years. I mean, most of us recognize the extent to which political rap either 1) doesn't get mainstream play and/or 2) has gotten less play in the mainstream over the years, but nobody has analyzed roughly every rap song to chart over that period of time.

    In terms of determining whether a song is political, I am borrowing from the "political agenda" of the "hip-hop generation" first brought to light in the book "The Hip Hop Generation" and then later through events like the National Political Hip Hop Convention in 2004 and through groups like Russel Simmon's Hip Hop Summit Action Network.

    Eventually I'd like to place changes in the success of political rap songs (as well as the type of political rap songs) in a larger historical/societal context.



    That's the short version...anyone bored to tears yet?
    test
  4. Snikka

    Snikka Vision Action Execution

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    I don't think I could do a thesis on somthing like that.... it's just not a topic I really care that much about.. especially not political hiphop..


    but good luck.
    test
  5. Fantom

    Fantom :ihadadream:

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    ever since Public Enemy's fame died down in the early 90's and NWA rose to popularity political has pretty much disapeared from the mainstream... Even Ice Cube was a little political when he went solo, but then flipped...

    Talib tries, but even he's crossing over...

    Mos doesn't even bother anymore really...

    and Eminem isn't really considered "political"...

    not really many mainstream cats doing the whole political thing, and the one's that try are only saying one or 2 lines...
    test
  6. identity-X

    identity-X No Talent Assclown

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    you're exactly right phantom. To put it in perspective

    in 1988, 10 percent of all rap songs that charted on the Hot R&B/Hip-Hop charts were, on the whole, politically oriented

    in 2000, it had dropped to 2 percent

    That's a TENTH verses a FIFTIETH!
    test
  7. My Name Sucks

    My Name Sucks New Member

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    thats hot man.... Good luck on that!
    test
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