Jesus the Egyptian

Discussion in 'IntroSpectrum' started by Yahunyahti, May 16, 2007.

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  1. SIZZLA

    SIZZLA New Member

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    lets jus look at it this way... egypt was at one time, in its time, the center of the world. the place where people came from all over to add unto the culture that was being built although, that growth was under strict controll. its like amerikkka today. it guides all knowledge as it demands and defines what is knowledge and how it should be used; consumed. its all relative. so, to say that things originated in egypt is an overstated fact. south afrikans migrated to north afrika and far east peoples followed... the stage was set, everone jus followed the leader. but, egypt got it from somewhere as well. its always been here! nothing started jus as nothing will ever end. thermodynamics...
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  2. Joro

    Joro New Member

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    X-Calli....read the book and educate yourself before you tell me what is or isn't likely. Only Zionists refer to the Bible as an historical document, for obvious reasons.

    Abraham was not the world's first monotheist. It's a fact that that title belongs to the Egyptian Pharaoh Akhenaton, who was a radical religious reformer. "J.e.w.s" of today are the descendants of Akhenaton's followers, who were cast out of Egypt after the Pharaoh's death. (The "Torah" is far from historical...it was written hundreds of years after the Exodus by a people who, after centuries of wandering, had lost the collective memory of their bitter split from their homeland. However, clues to the truth are to be found in the Biblical account.)

    And as far as the "Eastern" religions go....I don't even have to go so far as to resurrect eye-witnesses to testify of their Egyptian origins. All you have to do, if you consider yourself a seeker of truth, is spend a month studying the vast religious precepts of ancient Egypt and it becomes clear.



    SIZZLA - NO, ancient Egypt was nothing like America of today. It's unfortunate that you as a black man have subscribed to a mythology that has demonized such a socially and technologically advanced, and righteous, group of black people as the ancient Egyptians were.
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  3. Joro

    Joro New Member

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    I'm assuming none of you will read the book i suggested....

    so I'll just explain part of how Greenberg proves his case.

    He takes the birth and death chronologies given in the Torah - e.g. Genesis 5:25-27, "And Methuselah lived an hundred eighty and seven years, and begat Lamech. And Methuselah lived after he begat Lamech seven hundred eighty and two years, and begat sons and daughters: And all the days of Methuselah were nine hundred sixty and nine years: and he died." - Greenberg takes these chronologies and puts them side by side with Egyptian King Lists.

    'Lo and behold, the years match up EXACTLY.

    So the Biblical figures and their stories are obviously transmogrified histories of Egyptian Kings and mythology.

    The "J.e.w.s" were in fact long-exiled Egyptians whose leaders either deliberately altered the truth for political purposes, or perhaps the collective memory of the masses had faded so far from the truth that the truth was ALMOST beyond recognition.
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  4. x - calli

    x - calli Guest

    im aware of ahkenaten. he was the egyptian pharoah who did indeed try to introduce monotheism to ancient egypt. his reforms were defeated because they threatened the political power and social status of the egyptian priest class.
    im not sure if he presented the very first monotheistic set of beliefs, but he was at least among the first.

    the bible is certainly not a perfect document, and academic studies of its writing have shown it to be composed by different authors. the old testament in particular is a mix of various texts and popular mythology (the sumerians had story very similar to noahs ark for example) so influence from egypt certainly isnt out of the question. but that also brings up the point that the deluge/flood myth is not egyptian in origin, so egypt doesnt seem to be the sole source of judaism.

    ill continue my search for knowledge, but i doubt that ill find definite links between egypt and the dharmic religions, other than a few concepts or symbols they may happen to have in common. and ideas/images that were incorporated much later wont say much - id need to find ancient links.

    on another note.. although i wont say that the bible is purely historical fact by any means, i wont dismiss the basic storylines in it. theres plenty of evidence outside of the bible for the ancient israelites and the canaanite land that they occupied - but you dropped a hint that the zionists have no basis for their claim to the land of israel.

    egypt was a very different culture than america or the west. america has much more in common with ancient rome.
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  5. coil grimely

    coil grimely Tears textcees to tidbits

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    this post is interesting.

    still reading.
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  6. Joro

    Joro New Member

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    X-Calli ..... you don't believe there's a connection between Egypt and the eastern religions?

    check out these books I found at Amazon.com in a few minutes of research.

    1) Egypt and India: Ancient Egyptian Religion and the Origins of Hinduism, Vedanta, Yoga, Buddhism and Dharma of India (Paperback)
    by Muata Ashby

    2)The Ancient Egyptian Buddha: The Ancient Egyptian Origins of Buddhism (Hardcover)
    by Muata Ashby

    Here's the links:

    Egypt and India: Ancient Egyptian Religion and the Origins of Hinduism, Vedanta, Yoga, Buddhism and Dharma of India: Muata Ashby: Amazon.ca: Books

    Amazon.com: The Ancient Egyptian Buddha: The Ancient Egyptian Origins of Buddhism: Muata Ashby: Books
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    There you go X-Calli.... instead of spending months searching through Egyptian texts trying to find similarities you don't believe can be found, just browse these books where a scholar has spelled it out for you.

    edit* And yes, Egypt DID have a flood myth. You've never heard of the lost civilization of Atlantis? Do some homework.
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  7. x - calli

    x - calli Guest

    i believe the myth of atlantis was ancient greek in origin.

    those books look interesting though.. i may have to do further research on your idea, because i havent seen this egyptian origin idea in common reading. still, i have to note that ancient egypt, except for ahkenaten, emphasized polytheistic beliefs of many gods.. and i dont see that same emphasis in the east. for example, while its true that the hindus have many gods, they still believe in some ultimate source of divine power. hindu beliefs are like monotheism refracted through a kaleidoscope.
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  8. Joro

    Joro New Member

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    It's funny cuz even Plato tells you he gets the myth of Atlantis from an Egyptian priest. Have you actually ever read plato?

    And the Egyptian form of polytheism is exactly as you've described that of Hinduism. "All" the Gods are manifestations of the "One" God. Read this extract of an article:

    The ONE Is ALL

    The Ancient Egyptians believed in One God who was self-produced, self-existent, immortal, invisible, eternal, omniscient, almighty, etc. This One God was never represented. It is the functions and attributes of his domain that were represented. These attributes were called the neteru (pronounced net-er-u, singular: neter in the masculine form and netert in the feminine form). The term, gods, is a misrepresentation of the Egyptian term, neteru.

    When we ask, "Who is God?", we are really asking, "What is God?". The mere name or noun does not tell us anything. One can only define “God” through the multitude of “his” attributes / qualities / powers / actions. This is the only logical way, because if we refer to, say, a person as Mr. X, it means nothing to us. However, once we describe his attributes and qualities, we then begin to know him. A person who is an engineer, a father, a husband, ... etc. does not have poly-personalities, but rather a mono-personality with multiple functions/attributes. For the Ancient Egyptians, the concept of God is similar.

    To know "God" is to know the numerous qualities of "God". The more we learn of these qualities (known as neteru), the closer we are getting to our divine origin. Far from being a primitive, polytheistic form, this is the highest expression of monotheistic mysticism.


    The One Joined Together

    In Ancient Egyptian traditions, Ra represents the primeval, cosmic, creative force. The Litany describes Ra as The One Joined Together, Who Comes Out of His Own Members. The Ancient Egyptian definition of Ra is the perfect representation of the Unity that comprises the putting together of the many diverse entities, i.e. The One Who is the All. The Litany of Ra describes the aspects of the creative principle: being recognized as the neteru (gods) whose actions and interactions in turn created the universe. As such, all the Egyptian neteru who took part in the creation process are aspects of Ra. There are 75 forms or aspects of Ra. As such, Ra is often incorporated into the names of other neteru (gods) such as in Amen-Ra of Ta-Apet (Thebes), Ra-Atum of Onnu/Annu (Heliopolis), Ra-Harakhte, ...etc. The solar energy of the sun is only one of numerous manifestations of Ra. That Ra is not just the sun (only a singular form), was also confirmed in the following verse from the Story of Ra and Auset (Isis), in which Ra states,

    "I have multitude of names, and multitude of forms."
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  9. x - calli

    x - calli Guest

    im familiar with plato, though i havent read him in depth.

    come to think of it, i think i did read that the atlantis myth was influenced by or originated from egypt. which makes sense, considering that alot of the ancient greeks knowledge and tech came from egypt.


    im aware that ra is the sun god, and a powerful deity of egypt. im also aware that when ahkenaten tried to introduce monotheism, he emphasized worship of the sun as the greatest representation of divine power. other than that, im not so sure about the parallel with hinduism.. but maybe so.

    ancient egypt certainly had strong influence on religion, but i cant trace everything back to them.
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  10. Joro

    Joro New Member

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    X-Calli....here, I'll take out the key sentences for you:

    "The Ancient Egyptian definition of Ra is the perfect representation of the Unity that comprises the putting together of the many diverse entities, i.e. The One Who is the All.....The solar energy of the sun is only one of numerous manifestations of Ra."

    The origins of hinduism. (see "Brahman")
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  11. x - calli

    x - calli Guest

    interesting. there may definitely be a correlation there..

    youve made some good points about the wide influence of egyptian religion.. i just dont think that ancient egypt was the origin of all religion. but this has been interesting..
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