I support the Venezuelans coup of Hugo Chavez

Discussion in 'IntroSpectrum' started by menaz, May 30, 2007.

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  1. menaz

    menaz Avant Garde

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    http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=20601086&sid=ajjbZdf_ZYy0&refer=latin_america

    Venezuelan government debt tumbled in local markets as people took to the streets for a fifth day to protest President Hugo Chavez's decision to pull the country's most-watched television network off the air.

    Concern that protests will turn violent again led investors to sell dollar- and bolivar-denominated bonds in the local market and move money out of the country, traders said. Police have detained 182 people since May 27, the day that Chavez let the concession granted to Radio Caracas Television expire, Interior Minister Pedro Carreno said last night.

    ``Clearly there is the perception among investors that things could go in any direction at this point,'' said Garlina Requena, a trader with Caracas-based bank Corp Banca CA's treasury desk, in a phone interview. ``There's uncertainty in the air.''

    The yield on the government's 6.25 percent dollar bond due in 2017, known as TICC, rose 18 basis points, or 0.18 percentage point, to 4.94 percent, the highest since November 17, at 4 p.m. New York time, according to Banco Bilbao Vizcaya Argentaria SA. The price, which moves inversely to the yield, dropped 1.6 to 110.20 cents on the dollar, the biggest decline since March 21.

    Chavez said yesterday he won't reverse his decision to take Radio Caracas off the air and also threatened to close Globovision, an all-news network that he says is trying to instigate his assassination.

    Colombian Border

    University students staged demonstrations in front of the Caracas headquarters of the People's Defender Office and CA Nacional Telefonos de Venezuela, the phone company that Chavez nationalized this year. At the Universidad de los Andes campus in San Antonio del Tachira, near Venezuela's western border with Colombia, police today used tear gas to disperse marchers, mostly students, Globovision news station reported.

    ``Fellow countrymen, don't get violent in the streets,'' Zulia Governor Manuel Rosales, who lost to Chavez in presidential elections in December, said at a news conference in Caracas. ``Violence strips our cause of legitimacy.''

    Carreno huddled last night with the mayors of Greater Caracas's six municipalities and heads of the Metropolitan Police and the National Guard to coordinate their handling of the protests. He said the police will respect people's right to protest so long as the demonstrations are peaceful and don't block traffic or threaten private property.

    About 107 minors are included among those arrested for their role in allegedly violent acts this week, Carreno said.

    `Touched a Nerve'

    ``This episode seems to have touched a nerve in the population and the degree of popular resistance seems to have caught the government by surprise,'' said Alberto Ramos, a senior Latin American economist with Goldman Sachs Group Inc. in New York. ``The demonstrations have also brought to the surface the deep polarization of the Venezuelan society which could generate further bouts of market volatility in the weeks ahead.''

    The yield on the government's 9.5 percent bolivar- denominated securities due June 2012 jumped 20 basis points to 5.36 percent, according to U21 Casa de Bolsa CA. The price fell 1 to 118 centavos, the lowest in a week.

    The currency strengthened 2.5 percent to 4,050 bolivars per dollar in the parallel market, reversing earlier losses, according to traders in Caracas. The currency has lost 19 percent of its value against the dollar this year.

    Venezuela pegs the bolivar at an official exchange rate of 2,150 bolivars per dollar under restrictions imposed by Chavez in February 2004. Venezuelans turn to unregulated markets when they can't get approval from the government's Foreign Exchange Administration Commission to buy dollars at the official exchange rate.

    Increased daily sales by the commission, known as Cadivi, are supporting the bolivar in the parallel market, Requena said. Cadivi data showed that approvals for daily sales rose to an average $209 million this month from $117 million in April.
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  2. Mike Hosea

    Mike Hosea New Member

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    at first I thought Hugo was an interesting person, he was always talking about helping Latinos and shit and I was with that, and I think that’s what won alot of people over for him, but now I think that was kind of like bush coming where I live talking a few words in Spanish and idiots actually thinking he cares about us.

    but the more I seen him and read about him, he becomes more of an idiot. his pride for his people turned into hate for everyone else. he has speeches spewing out racist bullshit, he’s paranoid as hell thinking everyone is out to get him, and maybe they are but its because of the way he does shit.

    people have legit fears of him becoming the next dictator and that’s the last thing any country needs.

    even though he has raised legit points like the hypocrisy of America protecting Venezuelan terrorists while enforcing their zero tolerance for terrorists attitude on other countries, and a few other things its hard for me to take him serious anymore because of the approach he takes, a few good points isn’t enough o make me over look his flaws
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  3. Any political power that has to shut down a TV station/network has begun their paranoid walk into tyranny.

    See: Thailand for more details.
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  4. UG MC

    UG MC Captain Zapp Brannagin

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    communism is dead. A failed ideology.
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  5. Stash

    Stash R.I.P Point Game

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    Hugo > Ronaldo
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  6. menaz

    menaz Avant Garde

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    Ghet is that duke.

    This isn't the first time Venezuelans have confronted their dictator.
    Check out this little repetitious gem of history I spotted.

    See: Food Riots in Venezuela 1989.

    Andres Perez's situtation is almost similar to Hugo chevz.
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  7. teq the decider

    teq the decider sexual predator

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    the moment the left gets excited by a foreign leader, you know he's a tyrant or well on his way to becoming one.
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  8. menaz

    menaz Avant Garde

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    teq keeps it real.
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  9. UG MC

    UG MC Captain Zapp Brannagin

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    ^^ I thought you were a communist?

    what, are you into free- market capitalism now?
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  10. menaz

    menaz Avant Garde

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    Classical libertianism.

    I grew up!
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  11. UG MC

    UG MC Captain Zapp Brannagin

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    ^^ but what about wealth distribution and helping the poor?
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  12. menaz

    menaz Avant Garde

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  13. UG MC

    UG MC Captain Zapp Brannagin

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    interesting post

    he last thing you said made

    And alot of that foreign 'aid' is 'tied aid' which forces poor countries to buy expensive American products and services while strangling thier own...

    b
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  14. menaz

    menaz Avant Garde

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    WTF? I have no idea what that sentence is saying.


    Which is why we need LIMITED GOVERNMENT in the FREE-MARKET, not more government control over the free market. We do away with bad government policies once and for all.

    That's why when people talk nonsense about the free-market they don't know what they are saying they just follow the talking points. They assume it is the free markets fault, but really it's too much government envolvement. I just don't agree with other forms of economy anymore because they create no real equality, nothing will, but free-markets with limited governement will make sure more money per-capita is given compared to what their third world governments pay them per-capita. Which is criminal.


    Limited Free-market is probably another reason why I'm for sweat-shops in the third world. What we might see here as exploitation over there is not exploitation to them over there compared to how much less their thrid world governments pay per-capita. Not to mention, like litterally their governments Steal from them, the Foreign aid we send,
    and their land and homes, when ever they deem it.

    Alot of people here have never lived in a thrid world nation or they are economical illiterate. They don't study the true effectiveness of free-market they just regurgitate anti-free market talking points like good little stooges.
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  15. UG MC

    UG MC Captain Zapp Brannagin

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    back to the sweatshop thing, I remember teq and everyone argueing about whether or not sweatshops were wrong.... he sort of convinced me that they had their benefits..

    bu my question is, WHAT did you read that changed your mind? And was it teqs doing?(b/c he also supported Bush/ the Iraq war/ the Neo cons/ and Isreal's war in Lebanon... and you see how that worked out)
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  16. menaz

    menaz Avant Garde

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    No teq did not influence me I can't even recall seeing that thread.
    I read more books than I read posts.

    I think, You're uncleverly suggesting teq and I have the same Ideal here,
    then comparing this ideal to what you believe are other failed Ideals teq has. Therefore, trying to insinutate my Ideal is wrong by default because you think everything teq thinks is wrong. However, if teq and myself are as you say sharing the exact same ideal here, it is still incorrect to postualte Teq is wrong about everything. TSK, TSK, TSK.

    My Answer to you is, Limitations on government has already shown effective when it comes to choices in schooling. You'd rather throw more money at a problem which never fixes the problem, I'd rather offer more educational choices which imporve even the poorest schools and education.
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  17. DP Banned?

    DP Banned? New Member

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    You do realize that the tv station openly cooperated with a violent uprising set to remove a democratically elected government, right?

    Furthermore, he hasn't really shut it down. Chavez refused to renew their public license, and as such they are still permitted to broadcast on satellite, the internet, etc.

    Now, say there was a violent uprising in the United States set to overthrow the government and it was supported by, say, NBC. Following the restoration of order, how long do you think NBC would be around for?

    This entire fiasco is ridiculous. There were thousands on the streets protesting against Chavez and it received large media coverage while the hundreds of thousands who poured out on the streets in support of Chavez were barely mentioned.
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  18. menaz

    menaz Avant Garde

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    You do realize, America shows movies of president bush getting shot don't you?You consider surpression of free-speech/expression democracy? lol

    RCTV was replaced by TVes, a state-backed "socialist" station which opened with cultural shows. Chavez supporters held a huge, night-to-dawn public party outside the network studios to celebrate the birth of the new "socialist television" and the end of the bitterly anti-Chavez media outlet.The government will now control two of the four nationwide broadcasters in Venezuela, one of them state-owned VTV. One of the country's leading dailies, El Nacional, denounced it as end of pluralism in Venezuela, and slammed the government's growing information monopoly. The archbishop of the city of Merida, Baltasar Porras Cardoso, compared Chavez to Hitler, and Mussolini.This is the first time in eight years (of Chavez as president) that the university students hold a massive protest, said Leopoldo Lopez, the neighborhood mayor.The media rights group Reporters Without Borders said the move was a serious violation of freedom of expression and a major setback to democracy and pluralism. RCTV's former owner, Marcel Granier, said Chavez was driven by a megalomaniacal desire to establish a totalitarian dictatorship.

    Number 1.) you lied. number 2.) His supporters are propagandized nitwits. Number 3.) Socialist Tv monopoly, In other words... No out side critism. number 4.) you worship totalitarian dictatorship.


    MSNBC and the Newyork times are actually working on it, Along with the ACLU. America is gully, We even show movies where the current president on of the united states of america gets assassinated. How many times has the New york times blown the whistle on bush adminstration again? lol Bob woodard also rings a bell. You love being oppressed don't you?

    Actually they were mentioned. However, Ghet and myself tend to back the ones against him for the obvious reasons pointed out.
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