I destroyed the Lat. Pulldown today...

Discussion in 'Health & Fitness' started by Smile, Apr 21, 2006.

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  1. Smile

    Smile New Member

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    Damn Steven.

    Fools who don't run or do cardio shit are risking shit.

    For real. I'm not the type of fool who wants to get the strongest because I could do that by simply just eating a lot and weight lifting but I watch what I eat and I run because I want to stay healthy.

    Running + Lifting Lighter Weight > Lifting Heavy Weight and Not Running
    test
  2. LikeWise3001

    LikeWise3001 I crush alot

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    us smaller guys have to cut out cardio when we are trying to bulk...


    i do 10 minutes of walking to warm up...


    man, i feel great when i am doing cardio though.... like on a daily basis I mean, not while Im running.... jsut like, when i wake up and thru-out the day.... i just feel good...
    test
  3. Steve Schade

    Steve Schade Bears>you

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    I'm going to start some cardio. I'm going to throw in some anaerobic interval running once or twice a week, prolly do some work on the bag too.

    ...And of course I'll have to play ball soon, so looks like I'll just have to limit it some and up my calories again.
    test
  4. I wArFaRe I

    I wArFaRe I Love 2 Hate

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    i usually warm up with 120-135 and do a couple sets with 180 then 195
    test
  5. Thoughtz

    Thoughtz Well-Known Member

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    Not doing cardio with a weight lifting regime = SERIOUSLY bad for your heart...look it up

    But on topic, depending on the machine I do 155-175 wide grip pulldowns 3 sets of 8-10.
    test
  6. LikeWise3001

    LikeWise3001 I crush alot

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    weight lifting and no cardio is bad for your heart huh....


    proof please?
    test
  7. Smile

    Smile New Member

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    There is no proof.

    It's actually better than not doing shit at all.

    This fool ain't know shit.

    Cuz even when you lift yo heart rate goes up, so that right there is helping you.

    But it does help to run after.
    test
  8. Thoughtz

    Thoughtz Well-Known Member

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    No proof? Please, youngin. I'm a certified Physical Fitness Instructor for the UNITED STATES NAVY. So if I'm lyin, I'm dyin.

    Maybe if you read some REAL fitness books/magazines rather than drooling over steroid freaks, you'd know something about GOOD HEALTH.

    Carry on.
    test
  9. Smile

    Smile New Member

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    Dumbass.

    It can't make it worse.

    If so, explain how.
    test
  10. !ron HorSe

    !ron HorSe New Member

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    Thoughtz if you don't mind who did you get certified with?

    Theres alot of BS PE certification institutions out there.
    test
  11. dlbiininja

    dlbiininja The Hip Hop Poet.

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    http://scholar.google.com/scholar?h...h training is bad for your heart&btnG=Search

    http://scholar.google.com/scholar?h...h training is bad for your heart&btnG=Search

    http://scholar.google.com/scholar?h...ning alone is bad for your heart?&btnG=Search

    http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=effects of no cardio with weight training&btnG=Google Search

    http://circ.ahajournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/circulationaha;101/3/336

    that last one is the closes i can find but it doesn't say just weight training alone is bad for you heart. in fact i have never heard that.
    i have been certified by issa, and 24 hour fitness. i have never heard any thing like this hell. i would like to see this as well thoughtz.

    cause i know at times even lifting can be aerobic. let me see hmm i know that weight lifting causes the break down of muslce tissues which releases the same type of chemicals in a heart attack was something that started with a c cause i know i had gone in for a blood work one time for something and they checked my blood and they had asked me if i had ever had any heart problems and i was like yea right. then next question do you work out i was like yea did legs last night and he was like ok that explains it.

    dehydration lowers water levels and causes potential clotting problems naw that can't be it but could be a potential heart hazard amongst other things.

    let me see thinner muscle walls hmm i wouldn't think so you would think that a heart that's being forced to work harder would thinking and get stronger unless there was already a weakness there which would be congenital.
    this last one is what i'm looking at as a main option. but we all know that as we change with age hell anything can happen that may weaken muscle tissue.
    hmm going to look into this one more actually myself havent seen that in any books i have read.
    test
  12. dlbiininja

    dlbiininja The Hip Hop Poet.

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    oh and on the record. narrow grip pulldowns with range of 180-220 sets of ten
    on my sets with a warm up of about 90 of ten

    always been the more explosive type of training. slow on the descent with the weights. good thing for those damn bars across your legs or i would always be doing pull ups damn weighing as lil as i do
    test
  13. dlbiininja

    dlbiininja The Hip Hop Poet.

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    http://www.medicinenet.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=50972


    The fact that studies searching for other evidence of weightlifting's advantages often were contradictory did not help resolve the issue. For example, for every one that showed resistance training reduced LDL (low density lipoproteins, the "bad" cholesterol) and increased HDL (high density lipoproteins, the "good" cholesterol), another followed saying it didn't.

    Doctors now recognize that weight training contains an aerobic component. But the real merits of resistance training may not be found in that aspect or in blood levels, but rather in overall changes in the body. This year, the AHA issued a position paper that credited strength training for reducing resting blood pressure.

    Fletcher still cautions people with high blood pressure to be careful when doing arm exercises, but endorses weightlifting as a part of most fitness plans. "We are really more liberally suggesting supplementing the aerobic experience with resistance exercise," he says. "For healthy people it is something they need, because it is beneficial as well as aerobic."

    Wayne Westcott, fitness research director at the South Shore YMCA in Boston, Mass., couldn't agree more. Westcott has spent the better part of 30 years preaching the virtues of weight training for everyone -- young and old, healthy and sick.


    aving strong muscles is especially important for people with heart problems. Many cardiac patients, Westcott says, stress their hearts doing simple, everyday activities like walking up stairs, painting a wall, or trying to open a stuck window. "But strong muscles [help] accomplish these tasks easily," he says. "The better the condition of your muscles, the more they can help your heart."

    Adding resistance to your exercise program, Westcott says, makes the heart pump faster. That forces the left ventricle -- the part of the heart that pumps blood to most of your body -- to worker harder and become stronger. Just like other muscles, the heart responds to hard work by growing thicker, stronger walls. "You get a larger left ventricle that pumps more blood with each beat, and you get a stronger pump and you can have a lower resting heart rate," he says.

    If a healthier heart isn't enough reward, there are some other benefits that might motivate you to start pumping iron. For instance, would you like to shed a few pounds? An Ohio University study on the effects of resistance training on lipoprotein concentrations that appeared in last year's first quarterly issue of the Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research reported no change in those blood parameters. But the study did note changes in the subjects' bodies. "The training program resulted in significant alterations in body composition (decreased in percent of body fat) and fiber composition," the authors wrote

    the metabolic rate also stays elevated longer after a workout using


    http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&lr=&safe=off&q=weight lifting bad for the heart&btnG=Search

    hey i think the problem is other factors that plays into this.
    test
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