How To Set Up Patchmix (EMU Soundcards)

Discussion in 'Audio Help & Tips' started by Arcane, Oct 25, 2005.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. Arcane

    Arcane Alcoholic Roadie

    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2002
    Messages:
    6,894
    For Cool Edit Pro/Adobe Audition (WDM Drivers)

    Plug your source (mic w/preamp etc) into the L analogue input of your card.

    Load up PatchMix and click on the ‘New Session’ button. A dialogue box will appear.

    Select the ‘44/48k’ tab and click on the ’44.1 Minimum -10’ icon. Make sure the ‘Edit Settings for New Session’ option is selected. Click OK. The ‘Session Settings’ dialogue should appear. For the purposes of this guide the default settings are fine so click on OK. If necessary you can change the sample rate from 44.1 to 48 on the ‘System’ tab, and change the Inputs/Outputs of your card to balanced (+4) or unbalanced (-10) on the ‘I/O’ tab. You can change these options at any time within PatchMix using the ‘Session Settings’ button so don’t worry too much.

    You should now have two strips present. The ‘Waves L / R’ strip handles the WDM output we will be using. It also outputs the internal Windows sounds. You will also have an ‘ASIO OUT 1 / 2’ strip. We don’t need this so click on the strip and click the ‘Delete Strip’ button, then OK. The ‘Waves L / R’ strip has a peak meter in its top insert; these are useful in solving problems when you aren’t sure how far the audio is getting.

    That’s our output, now we need an input. Click on the ‘Create Strip’ button, select the ‘Physical Source’ button and select ‘I/O Card In L’ option from the drop down list. Then click on OK.

    An ‘I/O Card In L’ strip should now appear. Right-click in the top insert of this strip and from the menu that appears select ‘Insert Peak Meter’. If you use your mic/guitar etc you should see this meter moving and hear the noise amplified from your speakers. However this guide assumes you don’t want to hear this signal, you only want to hear the noise that is being outputted by your recording software so you can hear any processing it has added. So click the ‘Mute’ button on this strip. The peak meter will still register the sound, but it will not be outputted.

    Now we need the signal to be recognised by the recording software. Right-click in the insert below the peak meter in your ‘I/O Card In L’ strip. From this menu select ‘Insert Send (Output to ASIO/WAVE or Physical Out)’. The ‘New Send Insert’ dialogue will appear. From the drop down menu select ‘Host Wave L / R’ and click on OK. You will now have ‘Send’ in the insert you clicked on.

    This should be all you need as far as PatchMix is concerned! If everything went ok it should look something like this:

    [​IMG]

    Obviously I won’t go into setting up your recording software as they are all different, but a few important points to remember:

    Make sure it is setup to use the E-MU WDM driver. This is usually in something like ‘Audio options’.

    Set the WDM latency. This is usually in with the driver options. Set this as low as you can, with the E-MU cards this is 10ms. You may have to raise this as your PC may not be able to cope with the processing required. However as I mentioned above this guide is written assuming you will want to monitor this processed signal, and if you are doing something like playing guitar you want the time it takes between you hitting a string and the sound being outputted as small as possible. Experiment with this :)

    Set the WDM inputs/outputs up properly. This could be a global setting or it could be per track. The output is pretty simple, you just want to set it to ‘E-DSP Wave [A000] 1/2’ (or similar). This will output a stereo signal to our ‘Waves L / R’ strip in PatchMix, which will then be sent to the line outputs of the card.

    With regard to inputs you will notice that your software seems to be receiving a stereo signal from PatchMix. But our source is mono! This is because E-MU’s WDM driver only works in stereo. The WDM send insert we put in our ‘I/O Card In L’ strip is sending two duplicate signals to our software which it will regard as a ‘proper’ stereo signal. Most hosts will allow you to split these pairs up (i.e. either use both linked as stereo, or 1/L and 2/R on its own). As we’re using a mono source I suggest you choose only one of the pair as your input. The inputs signals will be called something like 'Stereo/Left/Right E-DSP Wave [A000]'.

    Turn on input monitoring. As I have mentioned, this guide assumes you want to hear your software’s processed signal. Without input monitoring you won’t hear the signal in real time, you will only hear it once you have recorded it and played it back. This may be globally turned on by an options menu somewhere, or it may be turned on for each track separately. Refer to your software’s documentation for more info.

    Source: http://www.cgoff.fsnet.co.uk/patchmix/wdm_mono.htm
    test
  2. Arcane

    Arcane Alcoholic Roadie

    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2002
    Messages:
    6,894
    For any other software (Cubase, Nuendo, Sonar, etc...):

    Plug your source (mic w/preamp etc) into the L analogue input of your card.

    Load up PatchMix and click on the ‘New Session’ button. A dialogue box will appear.

    Select the ‘44/48k’ tab and click on the ’44.1 Minimum -10’ icon. Make sure the ‘Edit Settings for New Session’ option is selected. Click OK. The ‘Session Settings’ dialogue should appear. For the purposes of this guide the default settings are fine so click on OK. If necessary you can change the sample rate from 44.1 to 48 on the ‘System’ tab, and change the Inputs/Outputs of your card to balanced (+4) or unbalanced (-10) on the ‘I/O’ tab. You can change these options at any time within PatchMix using the ‘Session Settings’ button so don’t worry too much.

    You should now have two strips present. The ‘Waves L / R’ strip handles the WDM output which we don’t really need it as we are using ASIO. However the internal Windows sounds use this output so you may want to keep it. I will leave this up to you :) To delete it click on the strip and click the ‘Delete Strip’ button, then OK. You will also have an ‘ASIO OUT 1 / 2’ strip. This is the output strip that your recording software will send its signal to. Each of the strips has a peak meter in its top insert, these are useful in solving problems when you aren’t sure how far the audio is getting.

    That’s our outputs, now we need an input. Click on the ‘Create Strip’ button, select the ‘Physical Source’ button and select ‘I/O Card In L’ option from the drop down list. Then click on OK.

    An ‘I/O Card In L’ strip should now appear. Right-click in the top insert of this strip and from the menu that appears select ‘Insert Peak Meter’. If you use your mic/guitar etc you should see this meter moving and hear the noise amplified from your speakers. However this guide assumes you don’t want to hear this signal, you only want to hear the noise that is being outputted by your recording software so you can hear any processing it has added. So click the ‘Mute’ button on this strip. The peak meter will still register the sound, but it will not be outputted.

    Now we need the signal to be recognised by the recording software. Right-click in the insert below the peak meter in your ‘I/O Card In L’ strip. From this menu select ‘Insert Send (Output to ASIO/WAVE or Physical Out)’. The ‘New Send Insert’ dialogue will appear. From the drop down menu select ‘Host ASIO In 1 / 2’ and click on OK. You will now have ‘Send’ in the insert you clicked on.

    This should be all you need as far as PatchMix is concerned! If everything went ok it should look something like this:

    [​IMG]

    Obviously I won’t go into setting up your recording software as they are all different, but a few important points to remember:

    Make sure it is setup to use the E-MU ASIO driver. This is usually in something like ‘Audio options’.

    Set the ASIO latency. This is usually in with the driver options. Set this as low as you can, with the E-MU cards this is 2ms. You may have to raise this as your PC may not be able to cope with the processing required. However as I mentioned above this guide is written assuming you will want to monitor this processed signal, and if you are doing something like playing guitar you want the time it takes between you hitting a string and the sound being outputted as small as possible. Experiment with this :)

    Set the ASIO inputs/outputs up properly. This could be a global setting or it could be per track. The output is pretty simple, you just want to set it to ‘E-MU ASIO ASIO1 / 2’ (or similar). This will output a stereo signal to our ‘ASIO OUT 1 / 2’ strip in PatchMix, which will then be sent to the line outputs of the card.

    With regard to inputs you will notice that your software seems to be receiving a stereo signal from PatchMix. But our source is mono! This is because ASIO works in stereo. The ASIO send insert we put in our ‘I/O Card In L’ strip is sending two duplicate signals to our software which it will regard as a ‘proper’ stereo signal. Most hosts will allow you to split these pairs up (i.e. either use both linked as stereo, or 1/L and 2/R on its own). As we’re using a mono source I suggest you choose only one of the pair as your input. The inputs signals will be called something like ‘Stereo/Left/Right E-MU ASIO I/O Card In L.

    Turn on input monitoring. As I have mentioned, this guide assumes you want to hear your software’s processed signal. Without input monitoring you won’t hear the signal in real time, you will only hear it once you have recorded it and played it back. This may be globally turned on by an options menu somewhere, or it may be turned on for each track separately. Refer to your software’s documentation for more info.

    Source: http://www.cgoff.fsnet.co.uk/patchmix/asio_mono.htm
    test
  3. Arcane

    Arcane Alcoholic Roadie

    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2002
    Messages:
    6,894
    To use patchmix effects:

    Follow all of the above steps for either ASIO or WDM drivers, and insert any effects BEFORE the send in each individual channel strip. This will apply the effect to any audio entering through that channel. The effect will be recorded in whatever DAW software you're using.

    There are two places effects can be inserted:

    1. The channel input strips (either ASIO/WDM IN Left or Right)-

    [​IMG]

    2. The master section inserts (before the block that says "send")-

    [​IMG]
    test
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page

Users Viewing Thread (Users: 0, Guests: 0)