how to master rapping

Discussion in 'Audio Help & Tips' started by makaveli21, Oct 2, 2011.

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  1. makaveli21

    makaveli21 king of the world

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    Prominent vs. Silent​
    More important that the number of syllables is what
    kind of syllables you’re dealing with. We’ve already
    covered prominent and silent syllables. (Check out
    the chapter on multis if you need a refresher.)​
    FLOW ​
    101

    Take a look at these lines from the hook of Mos Def
    and Talib Kweli’s “Respiration.” You’ll notice that
    the beginnings of the lines are stressed differently,
    but the end of each line is stressed exactly the same.
    Remember “/” means prominent or stressed, and “–“
    means silent or unstressed.
    / - - - / - - / - /​
    So much on my mind that I can’t recline ​
    (10)
    - - / - - / - - / - /

    Blastin’ holes in the night till she bled sunshine ​
    (11)
    It’s always important to have the last few syllables in
    your lines stressed the same way. Rap that out loud.

    Then try this and decide which works better:
    test
  2. makaveli21

    makaveli21 king of the world

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    / - - - / - - / - /​
    So much on my mind that I can’t recline ​
    (10)
    - - / - - / / - / -

    Blastin’ holes in the night, now it’s ME time ​
    (11)
    That sounds wack. That’s why you should never rhyme
    “fur” with “wonder,” because the DER in
    wonder isn’t
    stressed.
    I wonder if Mos Def’s high school English teacher
    ever told him that he was rapping in a variation on

    anapestic tetrameter, which is metrically related to
    test
  3. makaveli21

    makaveli21 king of the world

    Joined:
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    the iambic pentameter that Shakespeare used. (That’s
    a little trivia in case you’re ever on final Jeopardy and
    the subject is Mos Def versus Shakespeare.)
    As you write your own raps, make sure that you’re
    stressing similar syllables at the end of each line. If
    you decide to break this pattern, make sure you’re
    doing it for a reason. If you’re not keeping track, your
    prominent and silent syllables can really mess up your
    flow. Let’s look at one more example of screwed-up
    meter. So some kid on the Internet wrote these lines:​
    I’m gonna kill all and murder you especially
    I’ll do it easily ‘cause you’re not better than me​
    He probably counted the syllables in each line and
    found out that there’s 14 in the first line and 14 in
    the second line. He figures the syllables match, so the
    flow will be dope. Wrong! Flow is about more than
    the number of syllables. Look what happens when we
    check out the stressed syllables. Pay close attention to​
    the rhymes at the end of the lines.
    test
  4. makaveli21

    makaveli21 king of the world

    Joined:
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    - / - / / - / - / - / - -​
    I’m gonna kill all and murder you ​
    especially

    - / - / - / - / - / - - /​
    I’ll do it easily ‘cause you’re not ​
    better than me

    You can see from the meter that these rhymes don’t​
    FLOW ​
    103

    work. It’s true that “especially” and “better than me”
    are rhymes, but they’re bad rhymes because they’re
    pronounced differently. You accent different syllables
    when you say them. In “especially” the “ly” is not
    stressed, but in “better than me” the “me” ​
    is stressed.
    Never rhyme a prominent syllable with a silent
    syllable. It makes the rhyme sound uneven. Not every
    single one of your lines will have exactly the same
    meter and speech pattern. That’s okay. Just make sure

    that the rhyming syllables are stressed the same way
    test
  5. makaveli21

    makaveli21 king of the world

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    Breath
    Control

    Ever heard those beginner emcees who have to gasp
    for air between lines? There’s a reason you don’t hear
    Snoop Dogg doing that. He has breath control.
    Breath control is actually closely related to the
    stressed and unstressed syllable count. The important
    thing is to make sure your words are evenly spaced.
    Unless you’re Tonedeff or Twista, you shouldn’t be
    putting 20 syllables in each line, or you’re going to
    run out of breath. Keep the syllable count closer to
    14, and you’ll have enough space to breathe.



    Write out a rhyme and then mark the meter using slashes
    and dashes to analyze how you use unstressed and
    stressed syllables. Make sure your lines match up.
    Practice This
    Your breathing doesn’t always have to come at the
    end of the bar, but most of the time it will. In general,
    try to breathe from your diaphragm (your stomach,
    basically) not just your lungs. You’ll get more air and
    more control over your air flow. Practice rapping into
    a microphone without gasping for breath or exhaling

    audibly.

    test
  6. makaveli21

    makaveli21 king of the world

    Joined:
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    Messages:
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    Rhyme Scheme​
    Where in the line you rhyme has a lot to do with how
    you flow it. For that reason, a tight rhyme scheme
    will always help your flow. For beginners: keep your
    rhymes on the fourth beat of each measure (the
    second snare hit in most songs). Make sure that
    you’re dropping a rhyme every-other time that snare
    hits. For more advanced rappers: use the in-rhyme
    and multi-rhyme lessons to switch up your rhymes.
    You can also take the rhymes off the fourth beat, and
    move them elsewhere in the bar, like the rapper Nova
    does in the next example.​
    Speed: Fast​
    Up in the laboratory, melting lithium in your ​
    iPod,
    Serving suckers up like
    IHOP, yeah it’s pancakes,
    You rappers can’t hate, I’m emceeing the raw
    iridium,
    You suck
    beryllium, my rhymes make you smarter just hearing ‘em,
    Appearing as a threat to the King, I got him
    constipated,
    Needing magnesium or something that’s
    concentrated,

    Vitamins and minerals you get, I am in the general,
    test
  7. makaveli21

    makaveli21 king of the world

    Joined:
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    Messages:
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    Generally seen as mental with a little bit of me​
    The speed with which you spit your rhymes
    determines your flow as well. Nova, an up-andcoming
    rapper from Pittsburgh with a devoted
    YouTube following, dropped those lines in what he
    called his “Periodic Table Rap.” Instead of putting
    every single rhyme at the end of the bar, he spit fast
    and put the rhymes in various places. Truly a unique
    flow. He clocks in at around 15 syllables per line. Not​
    as fast as Twista, but speedy nonetheless.
    test
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