how to master rapping

Discussion in 'Audio Help & Tips' started by makaveli21, Oct 2, 2011.

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  1. makaveli21

    makaveli21 king of the world

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    Part 1 [BASIC]​
    What are multis?​
    Multi is short for “multi-syllable rhyme.” Multies
    are phrases in which more than one syllable rhymes.
    Multies can be double, triple, quadruple (etc…)
    rhymes.
    Normal rhyme: ​
    cat / hat

    Multi rhyme: ​
    my cat / hi-hat

    Or a longer multi: bit my cat / hit the hi-hat


    test
  2. makaveli21

    makaveli21 king of the world

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    Lesson Part 2 [ADVANCED]
    Okay, so you’ve worked through the basic lesson
    and you want to take it further. The next thing you
    need to know is the difference between prominent
    (or “stressed”) syllables and silent (or “unstressed”)
    syllables. It’s the same thing that your English teacher
    was teaching you when you did that Shakespeare lesson
    on iambic pentameter. In this case, we’re going to use


    prominent syllables and a dash (-) over the silent
    syllables.
    For example, say this out loud:
    Today is the first day of the rest of my life
    Meter is a map of which syllables are stressed and
    which are not. The meter would be something like
    this:
    - / - - / / - - / - - /
    Today is the first day of the rest of my life.
    This is a typical example because often times “little”
    words (to, is, the, of) are silent. Obviously, when we’re
    talking about a silent syllable, we don’t mean literally

    silent. Silent just means it’s not prominent.


    The simplest way of figuring out which syllables are
    prominent and which are silent is just to say the line
    out loud and listen to what you pronounce strongly
    and what you don’t.
    Why is That Important to Know?
    Because with multis it’s important to make sure that
    you rhyme with all the prominent syllables. You don’t
    have to rhyme with the silent syllables. For example,

    take this line:


    Behind my house is the most twisted of trees
    If I want to write a multi rhyme with “twisted of
    trees,” the first thing I need to do is figure out what is
    prominent and what isn’t. So I’ll map it out like this:
    - / - / - - / / - - /
    Behind my house is the most twisted of trees
    All I really have to pay attention to is the rhyming
    phrase, “twisted of trees.” As you can see, the
    prominent sounds are “twist” and “trees.” The silent
    sounds are “ed” and “of”. That means that when I’m
    writing my multi, I need to rhyme with “twist” and
    “trees”, but I don’t need to rhyme with the “ed” or the
    “of”.
    So these work:
    Mystical knee
    Listen to me


    Then I just pick one and write a line with it:
    Behind my house is the most twisted of trees,
    I always ignore the birds, but I mess with the
    bees
    Even though “ed of” doesn’t rhyme with “with the”, it

    doesn’t matter because they’re unstressed syllables.


    The line still flows.​
    test
  3. makaveli21

    makaveli21 king of the world

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    What About Longer Multis?
    I’m glad you asked. Some rappers (especially
    underground rappers) like to string together long-ashell
    multis to impress their listeners. You don’t always
    have to do this, but if you can drop a long-string multi
    occasionally, it will hit like a sound bomb.
    Take this line:
    / - / /
    Always on point with words that cut sharp
    If we rhymed with “sharp” it would not be a multi.


    If we rhymed with “cut sharp” it
    would be a multi.
    Instead of just that, let’s try rhyming with “words
    (that) cut sharp” to make a long multi. Remember,
    because “that” isn’t prominent, we can ignore it. We
    just need to rhyme with
    words, cut, and sharp.

    nerds that aren’t smart

    nervous you might fart

    test
  4. breathlesss

    breathlesss Registered Sex Offender

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    good tutorial on the multis, but sorta bad examples...coulda been more like...

    always on point with words that cut sharp
    hittin' the mark like a perfect thrust dart
    i spit fire, lips gettin' burnt from tongue sparks
    bright enough it seems like i turned the sun dark


    but, there's so much more than just end of line multis, there's the inner workings that really numb the brain by sounding so similar yet being made of entirely different words, one of the most intricate i've come up with is


    Spear a chilled peer amidst all their boggled prophecies
    in spiritual pyramids, 'til there, bog-illed profits cease


    but that amount hits the limit where it sounds so similar, unless it's read, then it's just sounds sort of off...so, you have to figure out when and where to cut it off...

    and as a large example, here's a multacular verse i'd written most of a long long time ago but just recently revisited when i out of the blue and finally thought of something to rhyme with
    there's grains of a civilization seein' no hope to come...
    the pain of an imminent danger bein' so close to us...

    i wanted to end it good and could never bring it to a proper close...still working on actually finishing it though...

    wow, actually just found it on my old myspace blog, originally posted february 13, 2007, and, i guess i did end it, but couldn't remember it, so yea, i'll just blend in the new rhyme to the old end and prolly finish it up better later...

    I put some underline, bold, italicyness in there to emphasize a few of the inner intricasies i was talking about



    even pine needles die seasonally together
    an' we combine evil minds reasonably untethered
    string an' twine, feeble binds, squeeze anything remembered
    a single time bein' fine, freezin' in heated weather
    with hot flecks of sleet dropped that scald flesh on whatever
    it got wet, the street's fogged an' clogged, dense, with every
    hot heads deep thoughts of nonsense, like whether or
    not sex occurs will deem how they progress
    ethereal blocked necks, yea, they got the spirit
    but it's not in their skull's yet, half of 'em appear as if
    they're slavin' over makin' self monuments, pyramid
    creators are wasteful in their periods of dominance
    I'm serious, c'mon instead of choosin' intolerance
    use fuckin' common sense, when yer furious, concoct a fence
    but drop yer defenses an' stop all the stressin'
    what sense is there if yer locked in the present?
    when all's said it's done, let the false edit's uncensored
    awfulness run, let the falls set it up since our
    opposite intentions are often the ones sent
    offered amongst our other honest assumptions
    through logic, deductive thought processes, watchful
    observation an' structured composite sketches drawn up
    by the prophets in my brain stem, if you want it, I can name them
    in my conscious, there is mayhem, Roget's, and laymen,
    an' engrained in the id my ego has so grown ta love
    there's grains of a civilization seein' no hope ta come
    (old ending lines in parenthesis...)
    the pain of an imminent danger bein' so close to us (an intellect pained to be the lone, woeful son)
    strains our intellect's framework with each emotional crutch (and the iminent danger of known global ruts)
    trudgin' through those global ruts as a lone, woeful son (opinions that strangle and won't open up)
    with opinions that strangle throats but won't open up (visions which hang over like slow motion drunks)
    (pinions in strained roles that don't hold enough)
    (an' minions who reign all with cold notions clutched)


    couldn't come up with the last 2 lines to make a complete 32 at the moment, but yea
    that is all, thank you, and you're welcome
    test
  5. makaveli21

    makaveli21 king of the world

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    there is alot more like syllable count and u can rhyme multi's all over the place in the bar
    test
  6. makaveli21

    makaveli21 king of the world

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    SYLLABLE/RHYME MATCHING

    Best read this shit, cos multis aint hard to learn
    and anyone ya battle'll walk away with heart burn


    ^see how "hard to learn" and "heart burn" dont match even though they rhyme? thats bad.

    Best read this shit cos multis really aint heard to learn
    anyone I battle, drop a verse n im leavin they heart to burn


    ^see how the syllables "matched" on that one??

    ..really aint hard to learn
    ..leavin they heart to burn


    ^thats a good syllable count... the multi doest have to be that long, but you get the idea.
    test
  7. makaveli21

    makaveli21 king of the world

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    Slant Rhyme vs. Perfect Rhyme​
    Here is the definition of perfect rhyme from the​
    American Heritage Dictionary​
    :

    Perfect Rhyme​
    Definition: ​
    Rhyme in which the final
    accented vowel and all succeeding consonants
    or syllables are identical, while the preceding
    consonants are different.

    Examples: ​
    cat
    , hat, bat; cake, bake, fake. They
    do not need to be spelled the same:
    great, late,
    freight; height
    , fight, cite. And the words don’t
    have to be the same length:
    rider, beside her;

    dutiful, unbeautiful.
    test
  8. makaveli21

    makaveli21 king of the world

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    1. The word has no perfect rhyme
    There are lots of words in English that don’t have

    perfect rhymes. Here are a few:
    orange, silver, purple,

    month, angst, sixth, breadth, ninth, pint, wolf, opus,

    monster, dangerous, marathon, napkin, hostage,
    discombobulate







    Perfect rhyme will work fine in a lot of situations.
    But hip-hop innovators (and poets before them)
    found it too limiting. Rappers began using slant
    rhyme to allow themselves more freedom to express
    themselves. Here is the definition of slant rhyme

    from the
    American Heritage Dictionary:
    Slant Rhyme
    Definition:


    A partial or imperfect rhyme,
    often using assonance or consonance only.
    Also called half rhyme, near rhyme, oblique
    rhyme and off rhyme.
    Examples:


    heat
    , heart; Tim, skin; dry, died;
    love, fluff.


    When Slant Rhyme is a Must​
    When should you use slant rhyme? Anytime. But
    there are moments when using slant rhyme isn’t an
    option; it’s a must.​
    SLANT RHYME ​
    27

    1. The word has no perfect rhyme​
    There are lots of words in English that don’t have
    perfect rhymes. Here are a few: ​
    orange, silver, purple,
    month, angst, sixth, breadth, ninth, pint, wolf, opus,
    monster, dangerous, marathon, napkin, hostage,
    discombobulate
    and many, many more.
    As you’re writing raps, if you ever wanted to rhyme
    with any of those words you couldn’t. Not unless you
    used slant rhyme. That’s exactly what Nas does in “NY

    State of Mind


    test
  9. makaveli21

    makaveli21 king of the world

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    Or the legal luxury life, rings flooded with stones, homes,​
    I got so many rhymes I don’t think I’m too sane,
    Life is parallel to hell but I must maintain,
    And be prosperous, though we live ​
    dangerous,
    Cops could just arrest me,
    blamin’ us, we’re held like hostages,

    Pro Example​
    Nas, “NY State of Mind”
    test
  10. breathlesss

    breathlesss Registered Sex Offender

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    there's also what i call accordion multis,
    where you split a quickly said multi (generally not using perfect rhymes) into it parts, using the silent syllables as expressed ones by adding new silent syllables to draw it out longer, this serves as a useful means of unorthodox rhyming where the end of the lines don't necessarily rhyme, but it still comes out sounding right

    in example (bold is the closest syllable to the beat expression)

    I'm a strike anywhere match, if you rub me the wrong way
    I ignite, so can you be prepared for that?

    an-y-where stretched with the can...be...pared

    where anywhere was essentially all silent syllables, the first and last turn to expressed ones
    test
  11. makaveli21

    makaveli21 king of the world

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    no disrespect homie but this is just multi syllable rhyming

    because if u look at the words anywhere prepared these words not ony match in rhyme but they match in stress syllables look up these words in the dictionary .
    test
  12. makaveli21

    makaveli21 king of the world

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    Rhyme Scheme​
    The rhyme scheme in a rap verse (or in a poem) is where
    the rhymes fall in relation to other words or lines. In
    a simple verse, the rhymes will fall only at the end of
    each line. In English class, when analyzing poetry, the
    rhyme scheme would be written out like this:​
    Rats in the front room, roaches in the back, ​
    A

    junkies in the alley with the baseball bat, ​
    A

    I tried to get away, but I couldn’t get far, ​
    B

    cuz the man with the tow truck repossessed my car B
    test
  13. breathlesss

    breathlesss Registered Sex Offender

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    no offense to you, but you seem to be missing something in the translation of vocalized sounds...

    and what do you mean "look up these words in the dictionary"? the definitions are completely irrelevant, and there is no exact "proper way" things are pronounced everysingle time, otherwise, you end up sounding robotic...or even worse, british...

    anyhow

    a multi rhyme of ... i'm a "strike anywhere match"
    would be something along the lines of ... not "likin' me there man"

    it's a lot to do with how sounds, not just syllables string together, and the minute pauses that give the intended meaning

    i'm a "strike anywhere"..."match"
    not a "strike" ... "anywhere match"



    another example of how sounds and syllables can be altered to fit one another are words like

    joy, boy, void etc. vaguely rhyming with things like
    going, bowing, no weed

    and also things like

    the floor will have to be "tiled when we get back"
    nope, nevermind, "I already did that"
    test
  14. makaveli21

    makaveli21 king of the world

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    :boohoo:
    test
  15. makaveli21

    makaveli21 king of the world

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    Wordplay​
    “I make rappers March like the third month”​
    -Punchline, “Twice Inna Lifetime”
    Wordplay has been used by everybody from Shakespeare
    to Atmosphere to make audiences ooh and ahh. The
    best rappers combine wordplay and metaphors to
    create amazing lines that people remember and tell
    their grandkids about.​
    What is Wordplay?​
    Definition of Wordplay​
    :

    Wordplay and puns are the same thing. There occur
    when words signify two or more different things that
    both make some sense in the context of the line.
    Wordplay is literally just playing with the meanings of
    words.​
    Example of Wordplay:​
    I bring more beef than a steak-house delivery.​
    This is made possible by the fact that words in
    the English language (and most languages) can
    have multiple meanings. Words can have multiple​
    dictionary definitions, scientific definitions, colloquial
    test
  16. makaveli21

    makaveli21 king of the world

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    definitions and slang definitions. The skilled rapper
    can bounce between these meanings to create a line
    that knocks a crowd off its feet. This is another way in
    which having a big vocabulary is a real benefit to your
    rhyme-writing.
    In the example that opened this chapter, Punchline
    plays on the two definitions of the word ​
    march (to
    walk) and
    March (the month after February). In doing
    so, he creates a line that stops you in your tracks,
    because it’s so freaking clever. You’ll notice that most
    instances of wordplay in rap involve metaphors as
    well. Later in the same song, Wordsworth notes that
    whether Sony or Aiwa, black or white, he fits “in all

    stereotypes.” That’s wordplay.
    test
  17. makaveli21

    makaveli21 king of the world

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    Time for metaphors: one of the most important
    elements for all the best rappers. Metaphors are also
    one of the most basic things you can use to elevate
    your rhymes. There are whole rappers (Punchline,
    Wordsworth, and others) who made a name for
    themselves almost exclusively on the strength of their
    metaphors. In other words, pay attention to this one.​
    What is a metaphor?​
    Here’s how the American Heritage Dictionary defines
    it:​
    Metaphor ​
    (noun) - A figure of speech in

    which a word or phrase that ordinarily

    designates one thing is used to designate
    another, thus making an implicit comparison,
    as in ​
    “a sea of troubles” or “All the world’s a
    stage” (Shakespeare).
    That’s a good definition. In hip-hop, that definition
    gets even broader. A metaphor is basically a creative
    comparison between two things. For example: “I’m
    going up faster than the price of gas” is considered
    a metaphor. “The price of chicken is going up faster
    than the price of beef” is not a metaphor (because
    it isn’t creative; it’s obvious). Take a look at these

    examples


    test
  18. makaveli21

    makaveli21 king of the world

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    A Bar is Four Beats​
    This is a little tricky because rappers and musicians
    use different definitions of the word “bar.“ To some
    rappers, a bar is two lines of a verse (one completed
    rhyme). To other rappers it is one line of a verse. To a
    musician, a bar has nothing to do with lyrics, it has to
    do with the beat. That’s the definition we’re going to
    use.
    A bar is the time it takes to count to 4 on rhythm in a
    song. This is only true of songs in 4/4 time signature,
    but that includes every single rap song I’ve ever
    heard. Typically the snare drum will hit on the 2​
    nd and
    4
    th beat in each bar. Many rap verses are 16 bars long.
    Others are 20 or 24. Some are 8. You get the idea. A

    line is whatever lyrics a rapper spits over one bar.
    test
  19. makaveli21

    makaveli21 king of the world

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    Basic Tips on Flow​
    While every flow is unique, there are a few general
    things that you can do to improve yours.​
    Counting Syllables​
    Counting syllables is the most basic way you can
    make sure that your flow is solid. The number of
    syllables in your line will depend on how fast you
    rap, but generally you’re going to want between 9
    and 16 syllables per line. You probably want most
    of your lines to match up fairly close in the number
    of syllables. Here’s what can happen when they
    don’t match up at all. These lines contain some good
    elements but are wrecked because of the terrible flow:​
    Spit flames, you get burned to the third degree,
    Plus you know I flow on more bars
    Than you could find down on Bourbon street,​
    Here’s the problem with that: there’s way too many
    syllables in the second line. It breaks down like this:
    line one has 10 syllables. Line two has 17 syllables.​
    That’s not going to work.
    test
  20. makaveli21

    makaveli21 king of the world

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    But it’s easy to fix. I’ll just find a few syllables that I
    can take out of line two without hurting the meaning
    of the line. First of all, we can take out the phrase
    “plus you know” from line two. That phrase is just
    a filler, and all it does is hurt the flow. That’s three​
    100 ​
    THE RAPPER’S HANDBOOK

    syllables gone, but I want to get rid of a couple more.
    So I’ll delete “I” and “could” which aren’t necessary.
    Now we’ve got:​
    Spit flames, you get burned to the third degree,
    Flow on more bars than you find on Bourbon street,​
    It’s much better. Line one has 10 syllables. Line two
    has 11 syllables. The flow is much smoother. It’s
    not like every line should have the same number of
    syllables. Some words you can say faster than others.
    But generally, they should be close. Here’s an example
    from “Lose Yourself.” In order to carve out his
    amazing rhymes and unique flow, Eminem keeps his
    syllable count similar. The number of syllables in each
    line is shown at the end in parentheses.​
    Snap back to reality, Oh there goes gravity (13)
    Oh, there goes Rabbit, he choked, he’s so mad, but he (11)
    Won’t give up that easy, no he won’t have it, he (12)
    Knows his whole back’s to these ropes It don’t matter, he’s (12)​
    dope . . .
    test
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