Evolution Question

Discussion in 'IntroSpectrum' started by yayo, Dec 8, 2006.

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  1. yayo

    yayo Polar Bear LaFlare

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    It's hypotheitical.

    We think that species A evolved into species B. We've run the genome of A and B and are very confident that A became B for a number of reasons.

    Species A has 15 pairs of chromosomes and species B has 16 pairs.

    How did the first member of species B find anyone with whom it could successfully mate? How would B's haploid gametes fit with A's given the mismatch in chromosome count?

    In which species have wee seen this? How would this work with ring species?

    I'm procrastinating here. I should really get to work...
    test
  2. Each being is a vessel of active change. "Hot wired" if you will.

    A slight change in a single particle of DNA can result in huge, system-wide results for any lifeform.

    In order to understand this, you need to know how DNA expresses itself. It is not a blue-print. It is instructions for generation. There is a difference.
    test
  3. Riz

    Riz Well-Known Member

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    So you've got a species which we'll label "1". Within the species 1 there are slight variations, so you have 1a, 1b, and so on. Let's say in this species there are 10 1a and 10 1b. In a certain environment, 1a dies and 1b survives. 1b's mate with each other, until the species become soley 1b's. As the environment changes, so do the attributes needed for survival.

    Dunno if that makes any sense, but it's hard to explain.
    test
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