Diggin in the crates for loonies on Charron's "Bath Salts & Vinegar Chips"

Discussion in 'Battle Video Archives' started by RapMusicNews, Jun 13, 2013.

  1. RapMusicNews

    RapMusicNews Member

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    “I knew a bitch named Charron” - Surgeon General, “Surgeon General vs Charron”​
    If you're reading this article, then you're probably Canadian. And if you're Canadian, you're probably more than familiar with Ottawa’s Charron and his scrappy, “dork-makes-good” ring persona. Often compared to battle rap's other freestyle wunderkind, DNA, the public perception of Corey “Triple C” Charron has never been quite as commanding as his Queens-born bizarro equivalent. Even though DNA's youth and background have prevented him from being taken as seriously as other “street” battlers, DNA at least came across like someone who at least made all of battling's alpha posturing somewhat believable.​
    In contrast, Charron's bread-and-butter, in terms of the last four years of his battle career and his gradually rising profile, has been his complete lack of affectation. He might make a reference to “boning chicks” that'd arouse a few sniggers from crowds and viewers, but he never portrayed himself as anything but a dorky, gawky (now 20-something) Canadian teen with “Rudy” levels of moxy and a proclivity for disrespectful, Big L-style punchlines. Who would've known that the Charron that we (the Canadian “we”, not me personally) grew up rooting for as the cracker-ass underdog on King of the Dot and Freestyle Friday was more like Big L than he let on?​
    Obviously lil' homie isn't a black punchline rapper from Harlem – unless he does Lamont Coleman cosplay on the side – but his debut mixtape, Bath Salts & Vinegar Chips, takes enough cues from the late Uptown spitter to come across like one of Lord Finesse's more likable grandchildren. Canadians love their underground rap, which usually translates to devoted, if conservative and orthodox, expressions of east coast boom-bap. For a debut, the tape is surprisingly consistent in that respect, despite showing the sort of growing pains that you'd expect from someone trying their hand at being a recording artist.​
    Bath Salts & Vinegar Chips is buoyed by the same kind of enthusiasm that made Charron such an endearing avatar for young battle fans, despite much of his in-ring persona being split and exaggerated to a jarring degree. If you don't know anything about Charron, then the slut-banging, dope-smoking, hard-partying, bitch-slapping, boss-move-making, multisyllabic lyrical phenom who deigns just who is and isn't a “pussy” might not seem like a drastic change, but then again, if you don't know about Charron then you probably don't even know this record exists. The disconnect between expectations of Charron and what he's delivered bring up age-old questions of “authenticity”, but, truthfully, if you read between the lines, the lyrical content on the tape isn't a new development, but the kind of exaggerated expression of self that's required to make interesting art. In short, there's Charron and “Charron”, and clearly the caricature – no matter how incongruous the idea of him “rolling through your city really gritty” seems - is far more entertaining than if he would've invaded Chedda Cheese's “self-depricating nerd” lane.​
    If Charron's aim is to make mainstream rap, he may run into some hurdles as he continues to get older and refine his persona and really define who he actually is, rather than coming across more malleable than he should be. Still, with the surprisingly consistent Bath Salts & Vinegar Chips, he already seems poised to take his local hero status from battles to the booth; his hunger is palpable throughout, and if there's anything Canadian rap needs, it's a dude who worships Big L, is a treasure of pop culture references, and seems pretty irreverent about censoring himself. But, it's up to him to show and prove whether he's putting on a front, or just evolving. His youth finds him erring too close to conceptual clichés sometimes, but he seems clever enough to know how important staking out a singular identity is. Hopefully Charron sees the big picture.​
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  2. VanillaNigga

    VanillaNigga Alf Gang 2.0

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    Hey that's great...and didn't read.



    Fix the god damn website it sucks!!!
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  3. Crescent Swerve

    Crescent Swerve Well-Known Member

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  4. RapMusicNews

    RapMusicNews Member

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    That's not my job and it's just a website.

    Get it together.
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  5. DancesWithCock

    DancesWithCock Active Member

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    You did a whole review and didn't say a single good thing about the album other than that it was "consistent"
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  6. RapMusicNews

    RapMusicNews Member

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    Said more than that. 'sides, a battler making listenable music is kind of a big deal.

    What'd you think of his record?
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  7. Cracka Azz Nigga

    Cracka Azz Nigga New Member

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    benders verse is reason enough to listen to at least that song

    op, please stay safe
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  8. kublaikhanjohn

    kublaikhanjohn Well-Known Member

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    Dude legitimately heres what i think. I sometimes read reviews on bva and feel they lack respect for the artists. It feels like a guy from the forum who talks shit about battlers is still trying sneak in subtle jabs while reviewing a rapper. You can be hobest and say charron image is this and that but this has an underlying passive agressive insult comedy vibe to it. I think cut that shit out when giving reviews.
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  9. martymcfly

    martymcfly Well-Known Member

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    ugh, what's with his emphasis on the punchline on EVERY track? they even pause the beat for the shitty rhymes. this is awful music
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  10. VanillaNigga

    VanillaNigga Alf Gang 2.0

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    If that's how he feels then why sugarcoat it? Charron is a battler, that aint gonna hurt his feelings. Every album someone makes the bva review writer is supposed to just say its good?
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  11. CharroN

    CharroN Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for reviewing/featuring this on the main page. I now have an album in the works with backing/distribution through Universal. This will have a more commercial vibe since the objective will be to obtain rotation on Much Music and a Juno.
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  12. headless verseman

    headless verseman JERSEY NUCCUH

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    ^your music is fucking horrible. Why anyone compared this unsure of himself nerdy awkward as fuck unbelievable content having ass cracker to Big L is fucking beyond me. Because the one thing Big L is known for is fucking believable braggadocio.

    Your battles are even worse by the way. Your entire persona is cringe worthy. Only on rapmusic can you find shit like this really.
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  13. headless verseman

    headless verseman JERSEY NUCCUH

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    I'll be honest though- the rob ford shit is pretty good. maybe ive only heard old shit.

    my new evaluation- your battles still suck. newer music is definitely worth a listen. live and learn
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  14. ecpresto

    ecpresto Active Member

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    Lol, what? How is that your opening sentence when you posted a thread on a website whose traffic is comprised of users from around the world and of which Canadians make up like <5%?
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  15. RapMusicNews

    RapMusicNews Member

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    It's an old running joke, nothing to nitpick.

    Good to hear. You seem like you have a really good shot, at the very least at being popular at home.

    There's nothing odd about the tone, though; no passive-aggression in the write-ups, they're really there to be informative/entertaining/promotional, and the thing is, who's going to read some bland biographical promo copy about underground artists most people haven't heard of? I just try to maintain that balance between finding the positive qualities of these records, keeping it 100, and not putting out some basic, cliche rap site pap.
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  16. vicissitudes

    vicissitudes New Member

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    Charron is no different than the majority of battle rappers when it comes to making records:

    He is really good when all he has to do is write Big L bars "he's at his wit's end like a comedian on a death bed" type shit.

    He is really trying when he does the other typical rap songs...the I got high/drunk and am contemplating why I always get fucked up song...the someone close to me died song...the inspirational/self-help feel-good song...the posse cut...

    But trying really hard doesn't equate success. However, he did NOT fail, if that makes sense. He definitely impressed me. It's interesting...I had low expectations for Charron but high ones for Ness Lee who caught me with a couple tracks but overall underwhelmed me and wishing he'd get more exposure and/or just put out Lil Wayne-like quantity.

    I have no fucking clue how I've been watching battles since the first Scribble Jam and commenting on GT/KOTD/URL/etc. videos on youtube for years now and yet this is my first fucking post on rapmusic.com....about Corey fucking Charron.

    wtf
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