Black History Month

Discussion in 'IntroSpectrum' started by BLACKANGEL, Feb 2, 2007.

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  1. BeEgEe

    BeEgEe El Warm Shot

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    lol

    shes trying to help you help her make sense of the crap you spew.






    your theory goes no where.
    its prescriptive and according to you, teleological


    good luck using that for you PH.d
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  2. menaz

    menaz Avant Garde

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    Like you, She isn't smart enough to understand the basic premise.
    Though I have explained it throughly three times. My concept theory is in the beginning stages. It's not 100% concrete, it will be, but it will take
    years.


    It's not teleological Either.

    Stop appling the wrong use of words to it.

    However, Plato, Aristotle, Aurelius Augustinus had teleological arguments.

    I'm not into Neoplatonism nor am I a Platonists.
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  3. BeEgEe

    BeEgEe El Warm Shot

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    lol.

    marx had a teleological view




    and she is smart enough.
    your theory concept is Crap!


    what color is your high horse
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  4. identity-X

    identity-X No Talent Assclown

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    i.e. "i can't provide operational definitions for the made-up terms I use"
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  5. menaz

    menaz Avant Garde

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    You're rebuttle is my theory is crap. LOL!

    My high horse? You're just a pissed off doltish midget.
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  6. menaz

    menaz Avant Garde

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    Not true.

    Again you assume with an Ad nauseam argument.


    Than again that's how you operate.
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  7. BeEgEe

    BeEgEe El Warm Shot

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    lol.

    my rebuttle sufficed
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  8. Leila Night

    Leila Night efrain,you're my one&only

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    How was that an ad nauseam argument? Does that mean he's in the right?
    Really, all I wanted was for you to clarify what you meant. No argument/nastiness on your part necessary.



    Thanks, Beegee, Id-X. =]
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  9. KEALYBOY

    KEALYBOY Ignorant is a pedophile

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    What a stupid line of argument. Being labelled as 'qualified' doesn't affect the validity of what someone has to say.

    Fucking hate fags that cower to women, in the process only keeps em down. But people equate kindness with deceit.

    The world's dope cos it's unjust and prejudiced and warped in every way, no one has it easier cos everyone's in the firing line from someone else, 'suffering' is relative to what you're used to.

    The view of 'the white man' as oppressor is complete garbage, if you look at history the English working classes have been more shat on than anyone, now they've got the cashflow in America so it evens out. But it's always been a small amount of people holding all the power at the expense of the masses, ••••es no different to crackas.
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  10. identity-X

    identity-X No Talent Assclown

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    what conclusions am I to draw when you STILL HAVEN'T OPERATIONALIZED YOUR DEFINITIONS?

    I'll come right out and ask. For the sake of clarity, would you please operationalize your definitions?

    If "no", then will you please shut the fuck up about people not understanding ideas that you don't explain fully in the first place?

    [teet]
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  11. menaz

    menaz Avant Garde

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    I have explained my premise fully. Like I said You make proof by assertion arguments, Maybe you should shut the fuck up and stop asking the same fucking questions over and over that I've already answered.

    I have clearified my premise for you many times.

    Ad nauseam argument, Means you're lack of comprehension has droven the arguement to the point of nausea. You're claiming proof by assertion, Though I've told you the permise 3 different times. Just because I'm tried of repeating myself doesn't mean you're assumptive statements are true or correct.

    What part of the FUCKING permise are you not understanding? I wrote it clear as day. This is the problem with you, you don't even know what a ad nauseam argument is. I will not repeat it again.
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  12. identity-X

    identity-X No Talent Assclown

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    we get the premise. we also both realize how fucked it is. that isn't the issue. i, for one, stopped caring about that aspect of this post long ago.

    what i am interested in is the fact that when asked to clarify the definition of the specific words/phrases you used (NOT the whole of the argument...that part we/I get, even though we/I disagree), you backpedal and use the "if you don't know by now, i'm not going to tell you" argument.

    you didn't use the specifc phrase "racial mindsets" until post #58 (here - http://board.rapmusic.com/showpost.php?p=14411701&postcount=58). at no point before then did you provide an operational definition...fine. but when asked, any good person of science, debate, or even common sense would do so to clarify jargon in the name of creating dialogue to further knowledge. in sociology, for example, you can't spell out the tenets of a theoretical approach to race and drop a phrase like "social constructionism" without defining it. even though many people might get the whole of the argument, a clarification of that particular phrase might strengthen the author's assertions. if you were to fail to provide an operational definition for a phrase as vague as "racial mindsets" in a research paper, you'd be chewed up and spit out by reviewers.

    all that aside, I'm just interested in getting a bit of clarity. contribute to the knowledge pool...help fellow humans learn...start with this....



    what exactly do you mean by the extremely vague phrase "racial mindsets"?
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  13. BeEgEe

    BeEgEe El Warm Shot

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    lol.



    somebody feels crunchy
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  14. menaz

    menaz Avant Garde

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    What's this we shit? two morons with close minds accounts as creditabilty? lol It's not fucked it is in the theorical process. You're acting as if it's 100% finished. And if anything is fucked it's your perception which adds little to no value to the conversation. It's kind of impossible to explain something if your not even listening as you just claimed.

    Specific words and phrases? You stupid fat bastard it would help if you told me what you want clarified. further more, What's the point in discusing, not arguing, but discusing something when number 1.) you're not open minded to my theory. number. 2) stoped reading my theory. and number.3) Keep making Ad nauseam arguments with no effect. You're tried some. If you want a straight answer from me, you have to ask a straight answer, but do it clearly.


    How can you browbeat my so-called vague replys when your questions are vague? Why because your pissed off? lol Racial mindsets has always been apart of my theory. The more you clearly ask the more details I give you. You're not a conversationalist, I've stated many times this is not 100% concrete. You're acting as if I've turned in my final dissertation. lol! I merely forming my Idea's I said that from the get go. I find it funny racial mindsets is vague to you.

    let me give you some examples...

    Guy 1: Do you think white people should have a history month?
    Guy 2: NO! all year round is white history month.

    Guy 1: do you trust white people?
    Guy 2: NO, Would you trust them after 500 years of slavery?

    Guy 1: do you think blacks are owed their own nation?
    Guy 2: Yes, Because the white man stole ours.


    That's just one racial mindset in the equation.

    Next time be specific and I will answer your questions. You can't just throw something out there like OPERATIONALIZE YOUR DEFINITIONS and expect me to even understand what the fuck it is your dumb ass is asking for.
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  15. identity-X

    identity-X No Talent Assclown

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    all you had to do was the same thing I did (without getting pissy, mind you) and ask "what do you mean by 'operationalize your definitions'?" (you could have asked me to, essentially "operationalize the phrase 'operational definition'" [funny]) and I'd have explained it...

    so...racial mindets are simply "thinking in terms of race" or acounting for race in analyzing some sort of social phenomenon?



    this whole topic/theory/whatever you call it should provide the material for your first book menaz. i foresee it being widely accepted and supported by intellectuals, social theorists, philosophers, ...and racists...across the board. good luck son.

    [funny]
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  16. BeEgEe

    BeEgEe El Warm Shot

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    lol..


    menaz angry so early in the morning...............


    hahahaaaa..





    no more spoon fulls of criticism for menaz
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  17. BLACKANGEL

    BLACKANGEL Angelic Professor

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    [​IMG]
    Charlie Parker

    "There was one thing he wanted to do. He didn’t worry about anything else -- as long as he could play that horn." - Jay McShann

    At age eleven, he had just begun to play the saxophone. At age twenty he was leading a revolution in modern jazz music. At thirty-four, he was dead from years of drug and alcohol use. Today, Charlie "Yardbird" Parker is considered one of the great musical innovators of the 20th century. A father of bebop, he influenced generations of musicians, and sparked the fire of one of the most important and successful American artistic movements.

    Born in 1920 in Kansas City, Kansas, Charlie Parker grew up just across the river in Kansas City, Missouri. By age twelve he was playing in the high school marching band and in local dance hall combos. It was then that he first heard the new sounds of jazz. Hanging around the Kansas City clubs, the young Parker went to hear every new musician to pass through. Some of his earliest idols were Jimmy Dorsey, Coleman Hawkins, Lester Young, Ben Webster, and Louis Armstrong.

    As a teenager he married his childhood sweetheart, Rebecca Parker Davis. Living in Kansas City, they had a child, but as Kansas City declined as a center for jazz, Parker longed to leave his hometown for New York. So, just around age twenty, Parker sold his horn, left his family, and hopped on a train to New York, where he was destined to change the face of American music forever.

    In New York, Parker had difficulty finding work at first, but playing with Jay McShann’s band he began to develop his fiercely original solo style. Within a short while he was the talk of the town and Dizzy Gillespie and other members of the Earl Hines band convinced Hines to hire him. Gillespie and Parker became close friends and collaborators. Of the time Gillespie recalled, "New York is the place, and both of us blossomed." Leaving Hines, the two moved on to Billy Eckstine’s band, where they were able to expand their range of experimentation.

    The seeds of modern jazz, or "bebop," as the new style came to be called, were also being sown by now legendary pianists Thelonious Monk and Bud Powell, drummers Kenny Clark and Max Roach, and trumpeter Miles Davis. All were frequent Parker collaborators on recordings and in the lively 52nd Street clubs that were the jazz center of the mid-1940s. Beyond his amazing technical capacity, Parker was able to invent a more complex and individual music by disregarding the four- and eight-bar standards of jazz and creating solos that were both fluid and harsh.

    Though the experiments of jazz were being heard worldwide, in the United States much of the popular media ignored the music and concentrated on the culture -- the berets, horn-rimmed glasses, goatees, and language that characterized the bebop style. Jazz critic Leonard Feather noted, "There was no serious attention paid to Charlie Parker as a great creative musician ... in any of the media. It was just horrifying how really miserably he was treated. And this goes for the way Dizzy Gillespie was treated -- and everybody." Due in part to dissatisfaction with the amount of critical attention he was receiving and in part to his years of on and off drug use, Parker slipped into serious addiction. On a two-year tour of California, his drinking and drug addiction worsened, and for six months he was in a Los Angeles rehabilitation center.

    It was not until his tour of Europe that Parker began to receive the attention he deserved. Visiting Paris in 1949, Parker was greeted with an almost cult status. His European trips also encouraged him to expand his musical arrangements, including backing strings for both touring and recording. However, as continuing personal and creative pressures mounted, he went into a tailspin: drinking, behaving erratically, and even being banned from "Birdland," the legendary 52nd Street club named in his honor. Throughout this time, however, one thing remained intact -- Parker’s playing continued to exhibit the same technical genius and emotional investment that had made him great.

    In 1954, while working again in California, Parker learned of the death of his two-year-old daughter, and went into further decline. He separated from his then common-law wife, Chan Parker, and was reduced to playing in dives. The cheap red wine he had become addicted to was exacerbating his stomach ulcers, and he even once attempted suicide. On March 9, 1955, while visiting his friend, the "jazz baroness" Nica de Koenigswarter, Charlie Parker died. The coroner cited pneumonia as the cause, and estimated Parker’s age at fifty-five or sixty. He was only thirty-four. Though Parker was a titan among jazz musicians of the time, it would take the country at large years to learn that for a short while in the 1940s and 1950s one of the most profoundly original American musicians had walked among them virtually unrecognized.
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  18. KEALYBOY

    KEALYBOY Ignorant is a pedophile

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    Charlie Parker was a rapist i saw it on wikipedia
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  19. BLACKANGEL

    BLACKANGEL Angelic Professor

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    [​IMG]


    The All-TIME 100 Albums
    Previous32 of 101 Next
    By Josh Tyrangiel Published: November 13, 2006
    ALBUM: It Takes a Nation of Millions to Hold Us Back
    YEAR RELEASED: 1988 LABEL: Def Jam/Columbia ARTIST: Public Enemy
    Album cover

    Chuck D. scared the hell out of America's white parents with lyrics that praised Louis Farrakhan and a delivery that made retributive black violence seem inevitable, rational and—egad!—cool. His deeply felt and commercially calculated radicalism was best expressed in "Bring the Noise" and "Rebel Without a Pause", whip-smart, reference-filled songs saved from pretension by Flavor Flav, rap's greatest hype man, who even makes the prison break in "Black Steel in the Hour of Chaos" seem like daffy fun. Producers Bill Stephney, Hank Shocklee, and Terminator X—known as The Bomb Squad—laced every track with siren-wails and funk explosives that ratcheted the tension ever higher.
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  20. BLACKANGEL

    BLACKANGEL Angelic Professor

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    PE formed in Roosevelt, Long Island, New York, in 1982, as an outgrowth of the group "Spectrum", the mobile DJ arm of the Roosevelt Youth Center's radio training program formulated in 1978 by Hank Shocklee, Krandel Newton and Eddie Murphy's first manager Ujima. Though originally the designer of the group's flyers, Chuck became the group's MC when Hank heard him rapping and was impressed with his skills. Around 1982, the group hosted a popular radio program over WBAU, Adelphi University's radio station in which they developed to compete with the newly-formed KISS-FM and to give exposure to local and popular rap artists. Hosted by Chuck D and Butch Cassidy, who would go on to head the Public Enemy sub-group "5ive-O", and deejayed by Hank's brother Keith, he was introduced to Flavor Flav when he accompanied "T.A." from the group "Townhouse Three" (later "Sons of Bazerk") to the studio to do a tape, which eventually led to a camaraderie between the two. Developing his talents as an MC with Flavor while delivering furniture for his father's business, Chuck and "Spectrum City", as they were called, released the record "Check Out The Radio", backed by "Lies", a social commentary - both of which would influence RUSH Productions' Run D.M.C. and Beastie Boys. They were signed to the still developing Def Jam record label after co-founder Rick Rubin heard Chuck D freestyling on a demo. Around 1986, Bill Stephney, the former Program Director at WBAU, was approached by Rubin and offered a position with the label. Stephney accepted, and his first assignment was to help Rubin sign Chuck D, whose song "Public Enemy Number One" he had heard from Doctor Dre. According to the book, The History of Rap Music by Cookie Lommel: "Stephney thought it was time to mesh the hard-hitting style of Run DMC with politics that addressed black youth. Chuck recruited Spectrum City, which included Hank Shocklee, his brother Keith Shocklee and Eric "Vietnam" Sadler, collectively known as 'The Bomb Squad,' to be his production team and added another Spectrum City partner, Professor Griff, to become the group's Minister of Information. With the addition of Flavor Flav and another local mobile DJ named Terminator X, the group Public Enemy was born."

    It then took roughly five years before their debut, Yo! Bum Rush The Show, was released in 1987 to critical acclaim. They went on to release the revolutionary It Takes a Nation of Millions to Hold Us Back in 1988, which performed better in the charts than their previous release, and included the hit single "Don't Believe the Hype" in addition to "Black Steel in the Hour of Chaos," chronicling a daring prison break. Epic samplers, Public Enemy saw Madonna and Lenny Kravitz, lift the beat for Madonna's hit "Justify My Love" from PE's instrumental "Security of the First World." The album was voted Album of the Year by the The Village Voice Pazz and Jop Poll, the first rap album to be ranked number one by predominantly rock critics.

    They also went on to release Fear of a Black Planet, which was considered to be just as militant and controversial as their first two releases. It was also the most successful of any of their albums to date and in 2005 was selected for preservation in the Library of Congress. It included the singles "911 (is a Joke)", which criticized emergency response units for taking longer to arrive at emergencies in the black community than those in the white community, and "Fight the Power", which is considered by many to be the group's anthem. The song is regarded as among the most popular and influential in Hip Hop history and was the theme song for Spike Lee's Do The Right Thing. The album's influence could also be seen and heard in the controversial song and video "By the Time I Get To Arizona" which chronicled the black community's frustration that some states did not recognize the Martin Luther King Jr. holiday. The video featured members of Public Enemy taking out their frustrations on politicians in the states not recognizing the holiday.
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