As far as I understand it, Muscles only pull...

Discussion in 'Health & Fitness' started by IssphitiKOzS, Apr 1, 2009.

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  1. IssphitiKOzS

    IssphitiKOzS Avalanche

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    but now I'm hearing that they push too... :screwy:

    I should say, by pull I mean contract.. and by push I mean expand...

    can someone explain this?

    I'll elaborate on my question. when you do a curl, your Bicep is pulling the weight. Your tricep is not pushing it... but not I'm hearing that (at the cellular level or something to that effect) that the tricep does actually exude some force, however small, and does push the weight.

    I understand that muscles do not only contract, they also expand... but from my understanding the expansion is just the muscle relaxing to it normal form, and that there isn't any pushing force there. All the force is in the contraction...

    know what I'm talking about?
    test
  2. LiveFromThe781

    LiveFromThe781 Don Of The Den

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    biceps pull because they bring the weight towards you

    triceps push because they bring the weight away from you

    your push muscles are

    triceps
    chest
    quads
    front and medial delts
    glutes

    your pull muscles are

    rear delts
    biceps
    lats
    rhomboids
    traps
    hamstrings
    test
  3. IssphitiKOzS

    IssphitiKOzS Avalanche

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    That's not what I mean though...

    see even though the tricep is pushing, the actual muscle is pulling, do a bench and watch your Tri's , they get smaller, they're contracting/pulling in order to push the weight

    my question comes in where someone has told me that the expanding muscle can actually exude force and work as a push.. which to me is ridiculous,,,

    example, If you are doing Tricep pull downs, is your bicep actually being used(adding force) in order to do the excersize.. and even if it is being used, is it being worked??

    my brother's in school for kinesionlogy and he's saying no, but my buddy whos discussed this with a biology professor says (on the cellular level) yes.

    I'd just like some elaboration from anyone for either side of the debate.
    test
  4. IssphitiKOzS

    IssphitiKOzS Avalanche

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    Just FYI, so you know that I really do know and understand what you're saying...

    instead of saying chest, rear and front delts... call them; Anterior deltoids = front, and Posterior deltoids = Rear, and Pectoral = Chest
    test
  5. LiveFromThe781

    LiveFromThe781 Don Of The Den

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    your antagonist muscles work to control the eccentric phase.

    push your forearm down, your tricep moves.

    put it back up, your bicep is moving.

    your bicep doesnt do all the work on the eccentric portion but it does help out.
    test
  6. Noib Da Mutt

    Noib Da Mutt New Member

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    there is an eccentric (lengthening) and concentric (shortening) contraction of the muscle that occurs... When one muscle is concentric like a bicep for example, its antagonizer is eccentric (the tricep)... Pushing and pulling just have to do with a reversal of concentric and eccentric movement- doing a pushup your tricep and chest is concentric while your back and bicep is eccentric, during a pullup your back and bicep are concentric while your chest and triceps are eccentric...

    This shortening and lengthening motion also helps with elastic (plyometric) motion such as jumping (a rapid lengthening and shortening) or throwing a ball (try to throw a ball hard without cocking your arm, or jump high without bending your knees)
    test
  7. Noib Da Mutt

    Noib Da Mutt New Member

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    to add onto why eccentric motion works the lengthening muscle...

    If you do a squat for example, the eccentric movement in your hip and legs prevent your body from collapsing into the ground- strength is needed at both ends in order to control the movement...
    test
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